Ius imperii: on Roberto Esposito’s The Origin of the Political: Hannah Arendt or Simone Weil? By Gerardo Muñoz.

Vicenzo Binetti and Gareth Williams’ translation of Roberto Esposito’s The Origin of the Political: Hannah Arendt or Simone Weil? (Fordham U Press, 2017) fills an important gap in the Italian thinker’s philosophical trajectory, connecting the early works on the impolitical (Categorie dell’impolitico, Nove pensieri) to the latest elaborations on negative community and the impersonal (Terza persona, Due, Da Fuori). Origins is also an important meditation on the problem of thought, and Esposito admits that had he written this work today, he would have dwelled more on this question central to his own philosophical project up to Da Fouri and the turn to “Italian Thought” (pensiero vivente). Nevertheless, The Origin of the Political is a unique contribution that crowns a systematic effort in mapping the rare misencounter and esoteric exchange between two great Jewish thinkers of the twentieth century: Hannah Arendt and Simone Weil.

In a sequence of thirteen sections, Esposito dwells on the question of the origin of the political in light of western decline into nihilism, empire, and modern totalitarianism. He is not interested in writing a comparative essay, and this book could not be further from that end. Rather, Arendt and Weil are situated face to face in what Esposito calls a “reciprocal complication”, in which two bodies of work can illuminate, complement, and swerve from instances of the said and unsaid (Esposito 2). Albeit their dissimilar intellectual physiognomies and genealogical tracks, which Esposito puts to rest at times, the underlying question at stake is laid out clearly at the beginning. Mainly, the question about the arcanum or principle of the political:

“Does totalitarianism have a tradition, or is it born of destruction? How deep are its roots? Does it go back two decades, two centuries, or two millennia? And ultimately: is it internal or external to the sphere of politics and power? Is it born from lack or from excess? It is on this threshold that the two response, in quite clear-cut fashion diverge.” (Esposito 4).

Whereas for Arendt the causes and even the texture of the political is extraneous from the totalitarian experience that took place in the war theaters of the central Europe, Weil’s response solicits a frontal interrogation of the ruinous catering of the political, going back at least to the Roman Empire. But Esposito does not want to exploit differences between the Weil and Arendt too soon. In the first sections of Origins he brings them to common grounds. First, Esposito notes how important Homer’s Iliad was to both Arendt and Weil in terms of the question of “origins”. In fact, the Iliad does not only represent a ‘before of history’, a poem that cannot be reduced to the narrative of the event; it is also an artifact that allows for truth. Esposito writes: “It is precisely the defense of truth through the name of Homer that most intimately binds our authors” (Esposito 8). Whereas totalitarianism emerges once politics is only a legislative instrument for seeking ends, truth for the an-archic Homeric poem praises both accounts; that of the victor and the defeated. Thus, any an-archic (beyond or before origin or command) is always, necessarily, a history of the defeated, which remains a demand in the order of memory. This is what Arendt’s admires and defends in “Truth and Politics” regarding the Homerian telling of both Hector and Achilles. But it’s also what Weil in her pre-Christian intuitions accepts as the survival of the Greek beginning in the commencement of Christianity without mimesis. To recollect truth in history beyond arcana (origins and commanding force) is to take distance from the force of philosophy of history, and its salvific messianic reversals. This is far from the negation of history; it is the radicalization and the durability of the historical, which Esposito frames with a cue from Broch:

“How can something conceived in terms of a caesura lay the foundations for something enduring? How can one derive the fullness of Grund from the emptiness of Abgrund? How to stabilize and institute freedom when it is born literally from the “abyss of nothingness” This is the question that returns with increasing intensity in Arendt’s essay on revolution…However, revolution cannot be an inaugural caesura and constitutio libertatis simultaneously” (Esposito 17-18).

This explains, perhaps only implicitly (Esposito does not say so openly), Arendt’s convicted defense of the American Founders over the Jacobinism of the French Revolution, which has only been an achievement in history due to the enduring progressive force of living constitutionalism. Esposito does not take up the fact that, Weil also responded critically to the Jacobin rule in her influential “Note sur la suppression générale des partis politiques” (1940). Esposito does claim, however, that any historical an-archy, insofar as it remains incomplete and evolving, must not resolve itself in genesis or redemptive messianism of the “now-time” [1]. This clearing allows for a passage through the origin that brings to bear the proximity of war to politics, which for Arendt delimits the antinomy of polemos and polis, as well as the difference between power and violence elaborated in her book On Violence.

Esposito lays down three different levels of Arendt’s positing of the origin of the political: a first one predicated on the space of the polis for the action of the citizen (polis becoming a theater); a second one, in which the agon is manifested without death; and a third, a Romanization of the Greek physis into auctoritas. For Arendt, Rome becomes a sort of retroactive payment for what was lost and destroyed. It is an after Troy in order to experience “beginning as (re)commencement” (Esposito 31). Rome is the possibility of another polis after the incineration, a tropology for amnesty within the historical development of stasis or social strife. Once again, the hermeneutics of memory over forgetting is placed above a philosophy of history that absolutizes the valence of the political. But it is in this conjuncture where Weil’s thought announces itself as an interruptive force in Arendt’s ontological conversation of the polis.

Esposito immediately tells us that for Weil the “origin” of the political does not run astray due to accumulation of historical catastrophe. According to Weil, the Fall is already original in the sense of being grounded in the event of creation (Esposito 36). Here Weil’s neoplatonic Christianity carries the weight. Weil posits an understanding of contradiction in Christian Trinitarian thought, although unlike the Carl Schmitt of Roman Catholicism and Political Form (1923), she does not substantialize this split through the reciprocity of its division into decision in the name of legitimate order. Weil, as it is well known, affirms a moment of creation grounded in its own abnegation. This revolves in the concept of de-creation that Esposito defines as: “a presence that proposes itself in the modality of absence, as a yes to the other expressed by the negation of self in an act fully coincident with its own renunciation” (Esposito 39). Conceptually consistent with Eckhart’s kenosis and later in modernity with Schelling’s philosophy of revelation, decreation is the Weil’s stamp of unoriginary foundation.

At stake here is the question of impersonal life, which in different ways, Italian thinkers as diverse as Giorgio Agamben, Elettra Stimilli, Davide Tarizzo, or Roberto Esposito himself have articulated in multiple ways in a debate that has come to us under the label of biopolitics. To the extent that decreation is an an-archy of this neoplatonic theology, Weil remains a thinker of the non-subject or of the trace of the finite that is irreducible to any modality of the political [2]. At this point, Esposito exposes the problem of force. Without fully embarking on a phenomenology of the concept in Weil’s reading of the Iliad, Esposito notes that force has the character of a total encompassing sensation that strips life unto death, belonging to no one, and viciously bypassing all limits. Here Weil cuts away from Arendt’s agonistic impulse of the polis.

The maximum distance with Arendt also emerges at this point: whereas Arendt conceived the Iliad of glory and claritas, for Weil it is “a nocturnal canto of mortality, finitude, and human misery” (Esposito 52). The uncontained force, the true and central protagonist of Homer’s epic, unfolds a negative community that Esposito calls, after Jan Patočka, a community “of the front”. Although Weil’s utmost divergence from Arendt becomes effective in the question of Roman politicity, which for her amounts to a juridical idolatry and a theologico-political glorification, as well as a prelude for the modern totalitarian experiment. In a key moment of this treatment of Weil’s critique of Roman law, Esposito writes:

“But what is even more significant for Weil’s arguments, and this is in contrast to Arendt, is that Roman law – ius, whose intrinsic nexus with iubeo drags the entire semantic frame of iustitia far from the terrain of the Greek dikē – is annexed to the violent sphere of domination. While the latter alludes to the sovereign measure that subsides parts according to their just proportion, the Roman iustum always belongs to he ho stands higher in respect to others who for this very reason are judged to be inferior, or, in the literal sense of the expression, “looked down upon”. This is the principle of a “seeing” that in the roman action of war is always bound to “vanquishing”…” (Esposito 56).

For Weil, Rome was representative of imperium and ius that subordinated the transcendence of its uncontested rule above citizenship equality, such as it existed in the Greek polis through isonomia. Devoid of citizenship, the Roman ius imperii is necessarily a dependent on slavery. Esposito notes that Weil’s anti-roman sense is more consistent with Heidegger’s critique of the falsum of the Roman pax as well as with Elias Canneti’s understanding of roman perpetual war, than with the Romantic anti-roman verdict. In its decadence, Roman politics as based on fallare opens up Christian pastoral power in a long continuum that later reproduces the basis for supreme hegemony. At the same time, Rome never truly stands for war, since it negates by declining conflictivity to peace in the name of domination. That is why for Weil the greatest discovery of the Greeks was to abide by strife as the mother of all things, while realizing its destructive nature. This makes Weil, as Esposito is aware, a figure of ignition, and a “combative thinker”. There is a sense in which the imagination of warring also colors Weil’s reading of Love in Plato’s Symposium, which positively informs her deconstruction of Roman ius.

But is this enough to leave imperial legislative domination? Should one accept Love as contained in war, as a form of warring and as a sword? (Esposito 72). The question that emerges at the very end of the Origins is whether Love can be at the center of a elaboration of a third dimension of the political, traversing both Weil and Arendt’s thought, and establishing perhaps a new principle for politics. It is to this end that Esposito argues: “…justice – love and thought, the thought of love – requires that what appears to others be sacrificed to what is, even if it remains obscured, misunderstood, or despaired (and this is precisely what Weil’s hero also proposes)” (Esposito 77).

Esposito writes just a few pages before that perhaps only Antigone succeeded in facing this differend, but only at the highest possible cost of destruction. It is at this crossroads where we find the last attempt to reconnect Weil and Arendt. However, love (eros) stops short of being a legislative antinomy and premise for a politics of non-domination beyond sacrifice or the payment with one’s own life. One should recall that Arendt’s doctoral work on Saint Augustine and love sheds light on Weil’s pursuit of love in facticity of war [3]. And if love always retains a sacrificial and Christological trace, then it entails that at any moment the condition of eros could dispense towards the very falsum that it seeks to undue. Could there be a politics predicated on love as an origin, capable of obstructing imperial renewal?

This is the question that Esposito’s book elicits, but that it also leaves unanswered. While it is surprising that the question of ‘the friend’ goes without mention in The Origins of the Political – the last twist in the book is on the figure of the hero or the antihero – it begs to ask to what extent friendship, not love, becomes the “deviation of the political” into an post-hegemonic region irreducible to the negation of war? This region is not possible to subsume in the impersonal reversal of the lover, the enemy or the neighbor. Perhaps the “He” that Esposito analyzes in Kafka at the very end of the book cannot be properly placed as an amorous figure, since the friend always arrives, quite unexpectedly, at the game of life. We abide to this intimate encounter beyond ethical and the political maximization. Moreover, we care for him, even when we do not love him. It is the friend, in fact, a figure that finds itself in a hospitable region, in a city like Venice so admired by Weil, where “he can rest when he is exhausted” (Esposito 78). This is a region no longer ruled by imperial politics, nor by its exacerbated modern perpetuity.

 

 

 

Notes

  1. The target here is messianism as represented mainly by Walter Benjamin and other representatives of salvific philosophies. Esposito notes that Hannah Arendt was critical of Walter Benjamin’s messianism in her “Gnoseological Foreword” of Benjamin’s Origin of German Tragic Drama. For a devastating critique of messianism and philosophy of history as a dual machine of political theologies, see Jaime Rodriguez Matos’ Writing of the Formless: José Lezama Lima and the End of Time (Fordham U Press, 2016).
  2. For the non-subject, see Alberto Moreiras’ contribution to the debate of the political in his Línea de sombra: el no-sujeto de lo político (Palinodia, 2006).
  3. Giorgio Agamben makes the claim that love in Heidegger, as informed by Arendt’s early work on St. Augustine, stands for facticity. See his “The Passion of Facticity”, in Potentialities: Collected Essays in Philosophy (Stanford U Press, 1999). 185-205.

Retreating from the Politics of Eternity: on Timothy Snyder’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century. By Gerardo Muñoz.

snyder-on-tyrannyWe often cite James Madison’s acute observation from Federalist 10: “Enlightened statesmen will not always be at the helm”. Timothy Snyder’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (2017), is written keeping this political conviction in sight, so indispensable to the democratic aspiration of the framers more than two centuries ago. Snyder, however, is no messenger of good news. In line with those that have taken seriously the rise of presidentalism, and the expansive politization of the executive branch in recent decades, Snyder is making the case for a timely warning against a potential threat for tyranny in the wake of Donald J. Trump victory at the end of last year.

On Tyranny is informed by Snyder’s expertise and research as a historian of Eastern Europe and the Holocaust, which have resulted in landmark contributions such as Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin (2012), and Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning (2015). In both of these books, Snyder has shown quite convincingly, how the erosion of institutions and the rule of law, due to both communist and fascist planning and dismantling over the control of the eastern region, paved the way for absolute anarchy and systematic destruction that made the Holocaust a juridical and political reality. Snyder does not mean to say, by way of an easy equivalence, that Trumpism amounts to a repetition of this historical period. Rather, On Tyranny is a precise warning on two levels: on one hand, it is a plea to rethink the necessity of institutions in the times of the rise of what Arthur Schlesinger Jr. called the imperial presidency; and secondly, to learn as much as we can from History, particularly from the historical evidence that confirms that every republic has always combated and affirmed itself against a latent imperial drift. Snyder’s thesis, presumably informed from a historiographical position, also suggests a political anthropology. In other words, the battle against an empire solicits an abandonment of the voluntary servitude that only feeds the incremental force of reaction. Our present shall not be indifferent to this.

After the 2016 election what is really at stake is whether the Federalist warning against the rise of factions is enough to contain an unprecedented alignment of vertical hegemonic power. There have been scholars, such as constitutional lawyer Eric Posner in The Executive Unbounded (2013), who have said farewell to Madisonian democracy in light of the exceptional upsurge of the executive branch [1]. On Tyranny does not go this far, but it is obvious that its purpose is not to engage in the aporias and intricate developments of constitutional law in order to render feasible an argument in favor of a retreat from hegemonic politics. Non-hegemonic politics always entail breaking the spell of a given set of coordinates that have produced an impasse. Snyder provides an array of historical examples: Rosa Parks in 1955 or Winston Churchill in the darkest moment when Hitler materializes his territorial expansion. It is in these perilous moments that the retreat from hegemonic politics does not mean renouncing political action. It means, first and foremost, abandoning the hyper-political consistency that defines the eternity and enmity of the political. But I do not want to get ahead of myself while briefing Snyder’s book. Havel, Parks, Churchill, Arendt, these are names that metonymically index Snyder’s plea for a politics of vocation in a time when rhinoceros are roaming through the landscape. The reference here is, of course, Ionesco’s well-known 1959 play Rhinoceros, which Snyder introduces when discussing the submission to politics of untruth:

“Ionesco’s aim was to help us see just how bizarre propaganda actually is, but how normal it seems to those who yield to it. By using the absurd image of the rhinoceros, Ionesco was trying to shock people into noticing the strangles of what was actually happening. The Rhinoceri are roaming through our neurological savannahs….And now, as then, many people confused faith in a hugely flawed leader with the truth about the world we all share. Post-truth is pre-fascism” (Snyder 70-71).

The rhinoceros are the political converts, which are always one step too close to the work of hegemony and its delirious power. It is then entirely consistent that Snyder also makes the claim for the protection of a new sense of privacy (sic) that could contain the boundaries between oikos (private) and the polis (public) against the drift towards totalitarianism (Snyder 88). Tyrannical politics is also a politics without secrets. It does not necessarily emanate from this position that a new egotist sense of privacy will act as a modality in an existence that is now beyond risk, guarding its own skin from the wild beasts. Snyder recognizes that there is no politics without factions, as Madison would have also said. Hence, there is no real politics without a minimal corporeal investment (Snyder 83-85).

But we have moved away from the level of hegemonic thirst for domination, conceiving a relation with politics that is not exhausted in the singular existence. Or put in different terms, only in existence could a politics of lesser domination be allowed to emerge against the threat of factions. Politics should not be oriented towards the end of the administration of life, which always amounts to a biopolitics. A republicanist politics is the orgazanition of public and social life that prevents both, the intensification and nullification of life in the polis.

What becomes troublesome, as Snyder makes clear, is that the administration of politics is today justified under the name of terror. In fact, Snyder states: “Modern tyranny is terror management” (Snyder 103). This is, indeed, an actualization of the schmittian withholding of the state of exception now normalized at the heart of democratic systems. Hence, the new danger is not just juridical, although it is also that. Snyder presses on the fact that current governments and parties – from Putin’s Russia to Le Pen’s Front National to Trump’s populist rallies in Florida or North Carolina – are borrowing props and gestures from the 1930s, a decade that Steve Bannon has labeled “exciting”. It is no surprise to anyone that we are currently living in times justified by exception in the name of the “crisis”. It is this time of excitement that provides a grammar of historical teleology and inevitability, and further, of judgment. However, the passage from inevitability to something darker is what Snyder calls the politics of eternity, which is really the core of his book, and the sign under which neo-fascism abides:

“…the politics of eternity performs a masquerade of history, though a different one. It is concerned with the past, but in a self-absorbed way, freed from with any real concern with facts….Eternity politicians bring us the past as a vast misty courtyard of illegible monuments to national victimhood, all of them equally distant from the present.” (Snyder 121).

If there is no real concern with facts, it is because all politics of untruth are politics to cover the Real, or what Jaime Rodriguez Matos has recently called the formless thing [2]. And for Snyder, national populists of the far right are eternity politicians providing a form that at the end of the day is just sending signs of smoke (Snyder 122). What is being covered is the void that leads to a point of no return: mainly, that there is no “greatest moment to return to”, since it is impossible to resurrect Empire. This inevitable untruth provides illusory grounds to radical right rhetoric in Europe. Although, we must infer that this is also the moment where Trump appears in its maximum existential danger to us.

It is uncertain if the institutions of the West will withstand this immanent threat. Although it is in this conjuncture that the rule of law becomes as central as ever before, and to discard it, is perhaps one of the greatest acts of moral decrepitude. It is here where we awake from the sleepwalking of eternal politics, as we are confronted with the historical sense that gives us the phantasmatic company of those who have perished, and that have suffered more than us (Snyder 125). It is in this affirmation, we agree with Snyder, that we find a substantial push against all tyrannies.

 

 

 

 

Notes

  1. Eric Posner & Adrian Vermeule. The Executive Unbound: After the Madisonian Republic. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.
  2. Jaime Rodriguez Matos. “Politics, Trace, Ethics: Disciplinary Delirium—On Trump and Consequences”. Paper Read at USC Conference, November, 2016. https://infrapolitica.wordpress.com/2016/11/14/politics-trace-ethics-disciplinary-delirium-on-trump-and-consequences/

Infrareligion in the abyss: on Jaime Rodriguez Matos’ Writing of the Formless: José Lezama Lima and the End of Time. By Gerardo Muñoz.

writing-of-the-formless_2017Jaime Rodriguez Matos’ Writing of the Formless: José Lezama Lima and the End of Time (Fordham U Press, 2016) is an ambitious and truly mesmerizing mediation on the Cuban poet José Lezama Lima in light of contemporary theoretical debates concerning the status of the political in the wake of Modernity’s decline into nihilism. Rodriguez Matos’ sophisticated intervention attempts to accomplish several objectives at once, and in this sense, the book does not pretend to be an exegetical or philological contribution to scholarly debates on the poet. Rather, in the book, Lezama is taken as a poet-thinker of the informe, whose main import into Western history of writing and thought is that of a ‘writing of the formless’ (Rodriguez Matos 171). In its totality, the whole book is a groundwork for such a claim, and it works through a series of tropologies, figures, and debates that extend from Lezama’s specific cultural Cuban context and its readers, to a set of wider debates pertinent to Left-Heideggerianism, political theology, or the event (although by no means, is the complex set of debates reducible to these three philosophical indexes).

If one were to describe the project in its most far-reaching ends, Writing of the Formless is important yet for another reason: by handling several topologies of Lezama Lima’s oeuvre, we are offered an in-depth analysis of the intricate conceptual wager in infrapolitics, or in infrapolitical-deconstruction, which as Rodriguez Matos suggests, is the provenance of Lezama Lima’s contribution as a critical task. The book is divided in two parts. In the first one, four chapters grid an explication of the problem of time, as well as that of the formless, revolution, and nihilism. In the second, Rodriguez Matos engages in an innovative reading of different zones in Lezama Lima that evidence the destruction of principial politics, and the opening towards an (infra)politics of the void. In this review, I can hardly do justice to a book that I truly consider a masterwork of contemporary thought. In my opinion, this monograph comes as close as it gets to being flawless in establishing conceptual premises and argumentative deployment. In what follows I will map some provocative elements of his exposition, in hope that it will be a starting point for a discussion with those critically engaging Latin America, the political, and the stakes of thought in our time.

The point of departure of Writing of the Formless is the temporal question (in Latin America, although it is not localized here as a site of privilege) of Modernity, which is registered as a Janus face machine: on one end, the linear time of Hegel’s philosophy of history; and on the other, the teleological time of the messianic redemption and reservoir to many salvific political theologies. Early in the book, Rodriguez Matos sets up to establish the conditions that guide the development of his task:

“But it now it seems that in fact modernity, and not any possible redemption or liberation from its political and economic deadlocks, is itself a mixed temporality that is constantly battling between a circular and a linear time – a linear time of alienation and a circulation teleological time of redemption. The two need to be taken together, even in the very (im)possibility of such a synthesis. And this would mean that modernity is no longer the other of the revolutionary interruption of empty chronological time; rather, these are two sides of a single coin” (Rodriguez Matos 33).

By way of this dual apparatus of time, it becomes clear that linear time represents the time of alienation, where the eternal return marks its radical detachment only to become the engine of the theological messianic interruption. The two temporalities that frame Modernity, according to Rodriguez Matos, are a policing force, as well as “a residual effect or the symptom of the emergence of order itself” (Rodriguez Matos 22). And it is this formal legislation that synthesizes a duality that veil, in a variety of effective techniques, the formless of any foundation. Throughout the book the formless has different dispositions, such as the “intemporal”, “time of the absence of time”, or Lezama’s own “muerte del tiempo”. These all play key strategic functions and deconstructive relays. It might be the case, at least implicitly, that Rodriguez Matos knows that the history of metaphysics to cover up the void is, at the same time, the narrative produced by its apparatuses. What is important, however, is that by allocating these two times, Rodriguez Matos is able to set up what was otherwise obstructed: mainly, the time of void, which falls right beneath all principial politics, always in retreat and outside legitimizing messianic and developmental policity of Western modernity that governs both the time of the One and that of the multiple. Lezama is the figure that mobilizes a drift away from these two modalities:

“…beyond the politization of politics, and beyond the image of time as synthetic operation, what remains is the possibility of thinking with the poet beyond the current apparatus of academic-imperial) knowledge and all of its returns” (Rodriguez 25).

One would not exaggerate much in concluding that Lezama Lima as a thinker of the informe becomes the necessary antidote and hospitable dispensary against the philological exercises of the traditional belleletrism, but also of decolonial and neocommunist designs that, although attempting at the surface to break-away with imperial semblances, end up carrying the guise of principial politics as the highest flagpole for self-legitimation.

The reading of the informe allows us to move beyond the temporal dichotomy between revolution and conservation, messianic originalism (such as that of catholic, later convert post-socialist official poet Cintio Vitier), and the multiplicity of historical time (such as that endorsed by Rafael Rojas, Cuba’s most sophisticated neo-republican intellectual historian). It must be noted, however, that many other intellectuals and thinkers are tested on this basis. The common ground shared by diverse thinkers such as Rafael Rojas, Ernesto Laclau, Cintio Vitier, Walter Benjamin, Bruno Bosteels, Alain Badiou, and those that subscribe to post-foundationalism becomes clear: mainly, the assumption that the crisis of nihilism of temporality can be amended by always providing an adjustment for the abyss. In this way, Rodriguez Matos offers a frontal critique of any claim instantiated in hegemonic phantasms: “Our task remains to think time in all its radical complexity – that is, to think time as something other than a solution” (Rodriguez Matos 44). Writing of the Formless stands up to this deliverance.

There are many important elements that come forth in this argumentation, one of them being that the covering of the formless, or the lack of foundation, is usually articulated through a master and masterable political theology. It is not just Rodriguez Matos who arrives at this conclusion, but also Bruno Bosteels by way of observing the inscription of Christianity in many of contemporary thinkers of the Left. In a passage cited by Rodriguez Matos from Marx and Freud in Latin America, we read: “All these thinkers [Badiou, Negri, Zizek], in fact, remain deeply entangled in the political theology of Christianity – unable to illustrate the militant subject except through the figure of the saint” (Rodriguez Matos 44). It is even more perplexing then, that Bosteels’ own solution to this problem ends up being just more political theology by way of Leon Rozitchner’s reading of Saint Augustine, and merely exchanging the category of the saint for that of the militant subject, even though this is already part of the history of alienation of Christianity [1]. But the reason for this might be, as Rodriguez Matos thematizes a few pages later, that any predicament for politization as supreme value today needs to ascertain some sort of militant subject of the event in order to guarantee a consensus on “contemporaneity”, and in this way avoids what the present is or what it actually stands for (Rodriguez Matos 109).

The chapters 2 (“Sovereignties, Poetic, and Otherwise) and three (“The Mixed Times of the Revolution”) attend to how the question of time was conceived within the Cuban Revolution. This framing, one must first note, already dislocates the grounds of the discussion centered on the sovereign or the caudillo, a fetish so dear to both revolutionary and liberal imaginations when confronting the ‘Latinamericanist object’. Hence, in chapter two, Rodriguez Matos advances a demolishing reading of the temporality of foquismo, although not on the grounds that one could have imagined. From a historiographical standpoint, it is common to agree on the fact that that both Guevara and Debray’s formulations have little substance in historical experience, since they are theoretical fictions that develop to master a non-repeatable event (the Cuban Revolution), which was far from being successful solely because of the foco guerrillero in the first place. But this is not Rodriguez Matos’ critique. The argument is set up to make the claim that the Revolution, in order to become flesh and conceive the unity and sameness with the people, theory must be first discarded (Rodriguez Matos 60). Rather mysteriously, in foquismo it is the people that ‘act’, while Guevara becomes its narratological supplement. This is the inversion of the Leninist principle that alleged that in order for a revolution to materialize it needs a good theory beforehand.

Guevara, in Rodriguez Matos, takes the role of the anti-Lenin. In fact, in a strange way, Che appears as a sort of naturalist-philosopher: “…what Guevara is after is the same time that was at issue in Marti: the idealism of the Revolution has to become a force of nature, sprouting in the wind without being cultivated…in all its originary ontological stability, phusis) and the people, without the transubstantiation of the idea into flesh yielding intimate unity, and without this force of nature forging revolutionary ideology…this passage would be nothing but the declaration of one individual from Argentina who has recently landed in a foreign land…” (Rodriguez Matos 60). Guevara is a hopeless romantic, who recaps the Romantic ideal of the fragmented temporality in the pedagogical poem, only that for him the impolitical people are in a “time out of joint”. This is why they must also become a New Man. The catastrophe of foquismo, is thus not merely at the level of a massive historical evidence, but an afterfact of a metaphysics that is already one step away from thinking the void, while formalizing it through a dialectical moment. Rodriguez Matos stages the central problem, just after having glossed Guevara’s revolutionary thought:

“For the metaphysics in question already relies heavily on the form in which it makes multiple small narratives. For the metaphysics in question already relieves heavily on the form in which it makes multiple temporalities appears together. That is, modernity is fundamentally and internally committed to the constant confrontation of disparate forms of time. Instead, I suggest taking a closer look at the time of lost time, the time of the void, and what might happen when it is not filled in but, rather, allowed to resonate in all its formlessness.” (Rodriguez Matos 61).

How should we understand this echo? The turn to Celan and Heidegger’s immersion in noise and the ontological difference validates immediately any vacillation in the answer, since what is at stake is ultimately to think not the “standstill of all time” of the messianic force, but our being in time understood as our most basic and intimate relation that we have with time (Rodriguez Matos 70). It is only this absent time of the formless that will be one of majesty, capable of undoing sovereign authority and its governability over the singular.

The third chapter moves against the belief that Lezama Lima can be grasped in interested disputes regarding his intellectual provenance, political ideology, or assumed Catholicism (origenismo). This is an arduous task, but Rodriguez Matos makes it look easy through a threefold operation. First, Lezama is moved beyond the antinomies of secularization and aesthetics, placed in the proper site of the religion of the formless (we will come back to this). Secondly, Rodriguez Matos confronts Lezama’s own interpretation of the Revolution as parusia or Second Coming, which coincides perfectly with Guevara’s own model of the “ways things are” that folds revolutionary Cuba into globalization due an ingrained total administrate apparatus over life (Rodriguez Matos 93).

This entails that revolutions, if we take the Cuban experience as metonymic of the phenomenon, are always already biopolitical experiences, even though Rodriguez Matos does not frame it in such terms. Third, by understanding the ‘mixed’ temporality of communism and revolutionary politics as convergent with the temporality of capitalism, we come to understand that the second is always on reserve in the backdrop of the state and its institutions (Rodriguez Matos 96-97). In sum, the superposition of revolutionary times with the time of capital is here shown, once again, to be two sides of the same dual narrative of modernity that turns away from the abyss at the heart of politics. This complicates many, if not all, of the assumptions that Cuban transitologists have disputed with very futile outcomes, in my opinion, in the last decade.

Finally, the fourth chapter “Nihilism: Politics as the Highest Value” rightly places the question of nihilism at the center. This is a return to the question of political theologies discussed above. Whereas many of the thinkers on both sides, republicanist and communist alike, take up the question of nihilism, the result, according to Rodriguez Matos, is that it is presented as a fight against those that think the problem of nihilism. Thus, the “banality of nihilism must be dismissed or critiqued” (Rodriguez Matos 104). The operation rests on the fact that the question of being must be avoided at all costs. And this is achieved in at least two main forms: discarding nihilism by proposing a “multiplicity of times” (Rojas), or by proposing a “living philology” (Vitier, Bosteels) that would be able to restitute a truth of a text of the past to give proper political ground (Rodriguez Matos 115). Now the tables are turned, and those that seek to cover the void, as if that were an option, appear as agents of a true nihilistic force.

The second part of the book titled “Writing the Formless,” provides a roaming through Lezama’s conceptualization of the void against politico-theological closure, arriving at the unthought sites of the ontological difference after Heidegger and deconstruction, and moving into infrapolitics. This is an exemplary section in the sense that Rodriguez Matos warns that he is in no position to offer a transhistorical formal theory of Lezama’s writing, and in this way he calmly avoids the universitarian-Master demand for a totalizing expertise of lezamianos. This operation is undertaken not for the sake of confrontation against Lezama specialists, but rather due to a more modest motive: it is not the point that drives Writing of the Formless. Anyone to counter argue on this level is rather to sidestep its most important contribution of this book. Finally, Rodriguez Matos lays out what is at stake, which is tailored as a question that by far exceeds Lezama Lima as a single corpus:

“Ultimately what is at issue whether there is a difference between those texts of the Western tradition that forget the question of being and those whose starting point is the challenge and the difficulty that the question poses, the challenge and the resistance involved in dealing with the ground that is and is not there in its absence. What is at stake is whether or not it is possible to imagine a writing and a thought that do not simply fall silent in order to guarantee the continuity of the narrative of legitimacy and sovereign authority in the poem or in politics – but the link between these two is also at issue here. That is, whether or not it is possible for posthegemonic infrapolitics to be something other than the trace of politics” (Rodriguez Matos 136).

What immediately follows is a series of closely knit constellations of the writing of the formless as absent time in Lezama, which I can only register here without much commentary: Lezama’s own critique of T.S. Eliot’s notion of the difficult, a critique of Garcia Marruz’s reading of the aposiopesis as rhetoric’s hegemonic property, Lezama’s understanding of Aristotelian metaphoricity; Lezama’s philosophy of an atopical One, and finally Rodriguez Matos’ own conceptual position of Lezama as an infrareligious and infrapolitical figure that pushes politico-theological legislation of principles to their very limit into a ‘nonsynthesizable reminder’ [sic] (Rodriguez Matos 154). Further, Lezama’s vitalist response to the Platonist pros hen, unlike the immanentist modern reversal, concludes in a Platonist affirmation instead of an overcoming of Platonism (Rodriguez Matos 139). Rodriguez Matos intelligently resolves this bizarre multiplicity vis-à-vis a parallel reading of Paul Claudel, who rejects aposteriori knowledge in exchange for the cognizant objectification of God before the sovereignty of the Poet. Although I am left thinking about the status of Neo-Platonism as it relates to the discussion of Christian Trinitarian thought [2].

But Rodriguez Matos goes further, and the Lezama that emerges from this destructive multi-level procedure is one that resists alleogrization, taking cue from Alberto Moreiras’ pioneering reading in Tercer Espacio (1999), as well as a privileged and secured position of a profane materialism over the question of form. And it is also in this very instance where Rodriguez Matos opens up to a complicated debate, which although unresolved, is the most striking and illuminating kernel of his book. In short: does ‘the roaming of the formless’ [sic] in Lezama offer something other than a trace of politics? I want to suggest, from my first reading of what is certainly a complex conversation, that this remains unresolved in Writing of the Formless. Let’s consider a key moment at the end of the book:

“For part of what I am calling attention to is the fact the staging of the formless in Lezama involves a thematization and an awareness of what should only be there as trace. This awareness goes beyond a more familiar claim regarding the self-deconstruction of discourses of their own accord – this is, after all, also what the trace is supposed to underscore. I would like to read this excess of awareness as a radicalization of deconstruction” (Rodriguez Matos 176).

This radicalization will entail leaving behind the moment of ecriture, which characterized the first wave of deconstruction in literary fixation and textual playfulness. Infrapolitics will be, programmatically speaking, post-deconstruction, or what Moreiras has recently called a second turn towards instituted deconstruction [3]. But the question remains: is infrapolitics then, a trace of politics? It is an unresolved question, but perhaps the most important one. Rodriguez Matos leaves us a clue at the very end of the book. When discussing the baroque – and let’s not lose sight of the fact of how late the question arrives, which is a merit and not a pitfall – Rodriguez Matos cites a letter of Lezama to Carlos Meneses: “I think that by now the baroque has begun to give off a stench” (Rodriguez Matos 181). The Baroque has come become an exchangeable token for the Boom, the last stage of identitarian transaction. But it is more than this: the baroque can no longer account for the informe at the heart of the image and rhythm.

Let’s probe this further. If the baroque is now exhausted, it is because all politics of the frame are insufficient to cope with the formless. The primacy of the critique of political economy today, for example, remains just one of its last formal avatars. But one could also respond to Rodriguez Matos’ final invitation, and say that while the aesthetic program of the baroque is demolished or turned into ashes, perhaps a trace of it remains in posthegemonic politics. To the extent that we understand the baroque as a political of self-affirmation against Imperium beyond hegemony, the baroque necessarily entails a republicanist politics [4].

In other words, while the infrareligious trace depends on the abyss, posthegemonic politics of republicanism sprouts from the baroque in early modernity against any imperial and counter-imperial conversions. Rodriguez Matos interchangeably speaks of infrapolitics and posthegemony throughout the book, therefore this nuance could be taken as a radicalization of the second term in line with the disclosure regarding the baroque. Post-deconstructive infrapolitics remains open. But if Lezama’s legacy is waged on having confronted the formless abyss of the absent time; perhaps, the author of Dador can also reemerge as a political thinker and existential representative not of Paradise, but of the secret Republic. This will entail a republicanism that, in each and every single time, does not longer participate in the eternal arcanum.

 

 

.

.

Notes

  1. This does not mean that St. Augustine cannot be read against the myth of political theology. Such is the task that José Luis Villacañas has accomplished in his Teología Political Imperial: una genealogía de la division de poderes (Trotta, 2016). In my view, Rozitchner’s La Cosa y la Cruz (1997) is a flagrant misreading of Augustinian anti-political-theology in exchange for a superficial materialist affective analysis. Although I do not have space to discuss this at length, I must note that Rodriguez Matos’ discussion of contemporary materialisms is also a timely warning about the easy exists that the so-called “materialisms” offer today as an effective transaction in contemporary thought. For his discussion of materialism see, pgs. 104-108.
  1. The question of Neo-Platonism is a fascinating story by itself, which speaks about the multiple in the One. Pierre Hadot studied its influenced in debates of early Trinitarian thought in his work of Marius Victorinus; recherches sur sa vie et ses œuvres (Paris: Etudes augustiniennes, 1971). Now, it seems that Lezama Lima himself was not foreign to Plotinus and Neoplatonism, which he linked it to the emergence of the modern poem. In fact, while reading Writing of the Formless, I revisited my copy of Lezama Lima’s unpublished notes in La Posibilidad Infinita: Archivo de José Lezama Lima, ed. Iván González Cruz (Verbum Editorial 2000). It was interesting to find that in “Oscura vencida”, a fragment from 1958, Lezama writes: “Si unimos a Guido Cavalcanti, March, Maurice Sceve, John Donne, en lo que puede ser motejados de oscuros, con distintos grados de densidad, precisamos que sus lectores, puede ser los más distinguidos cortesanos, o estudiantes que versifican cuando la hija del tabernero inaugura unos zarbillos…Con una apresurada lectura de la Metafísica de Aristóteles, sobre todo su genial concepto del tiempo que pasa a Hegel (sic) y a Heidegger; con cuatro diálogos platónicos, donde desde luego no faltara el Parménides. Con algunas añadiduras de Plotino sobre la sustancia y el uno…ya está el afanoso de la voluptuosos métrica en placentera potencialidad para saborear una canción medieval, un soneto del renacimiento florentino, o una ingenua aglomeración escolástica que se quiere sensibilizar, o una súmala de saber infantil, regida por un pulso que no se abandonó a la plácida oficiosa…” (252). This does not necessarily dodge Rodriguez Matos’ discussion of Claudel, but complicates it, since the trinity also merges at different points throughout the book. My question is whether any discussion of Trinitarian co-substantialism is still embedded in metaphysical structuration as potentia absoluta, or if Lezama’s informe is a Parthian attack against this influential model of absolute potentiality by turning it into a monstrous infrareligion. At stake here is also the issue of ‘reversibility’ that is obliquely exposed at the end of the book (Rodriguez Matos 189).
  1. See Alberto Moreiras, “Comentario a Glas, de Jacques Derrida”. https://infrapolitica.wordpress.com/2017/01/13/comentario-a-glas-de-jacques-derrida-notas-para-la-presentacion-de-la-nueva-traduccion-espanola-clamor-publicada-en-madrid-la-oficina-2016-y-hecha-por-muchos-autores-con-copyright-de-cristina/
  1. The question of the republicanist politics, Imperium, and the baroque is studied in detailed in Ángel Octavio Álvarez Solis’ La República de la Melancolía: Politica y Subjetividad en el Barroco (La Cebra, 2015).

Chesterton y Podemos. Por Gerardo Muñoz.

malagon-iglesias1

En estos días he recordado un artículo de G. K. Chesterton sobre Lenin, donde este dice que podemos entender la justificación del leninismo de ser antidemocrático ante la ignorancia del campesinado ruso, pero lo que no podemos aceptar es una idea que es en sí irracional [1]. Algo parecido se puede decir sobre Pablo Iglesias en la segunda asamblea en Vistalegre. Esto es, podemos escuchar su arenga sobre la unidad y el enemigo, pero más difícil es razonar cómo eso se ajusta a las ideas errejonistas de transversalidad y pluralismo.

La brecha entre el primer postulado y el segundo que han salido a flote al final de Vistalegre 2, encajan con lo que Chesterton llamó ‘ilogicidad’. Ese déficit de razón solo se entiende con el significante vacío y la teoría que la sostiene. Pero sabemos que todo político que se considere digno de esa vocación, tiene que cuidar, a distancia, la diferencia irreducible de su par. Es esto lo que va al traste con el brochazo que ha dado Iglesias en su discurso de clausura [2]. Ahora el balón está del lado de los errejonistas, y tendremos que esperar para ver si hay posibilidad de recomposición de su parte. Pero lo cierto es que al imponerse el significante vacío se arriesga el destape de una violencia aún mayor siempre depositada en el oppositorum cesarista.

En un provechoso encuentro con algunos miembros de Podemos en estos días, la pregunta caliente fue qué hacer después de Vistalegre 2. Esta pregunta ya de por sí visibiliza las grietas y visiones encontradas, los desaires y las traiciones. Todo es resumible con lo que hemos llamado antes “falta de legitimidad”. Una solución entre optimista y reparadora, se afinca en buscar exceder a Podemos como partido-institución-líder. Esto es, volver a cierto ‘originalismo’ del 15M bajo la idea de la comunidad. Sin embargo, la comunidad no puede ser principio último de la razón política, como tampoco puede ser una alternativa contra-hegemónica ante el belicismo hegemónico. El comunitarismo como propuesta es siempre insuficiente.

Hay que tomar distancia del comunitarismo reparador y redentor. La tarea de hoy recae solo en una formulación de contracomunidad, capaz de disociarse del ascenso de particularismos radicales que conducen inevitablemente al fin de la política (que por cierto, lo decía el propio Ernesto Laclau, como lo ha recordado en estos días Alberto Moreiras). Tampoco se puede rebobinar la historia ni echar para adelante hacia una dirección que solo llevaría al PP, y a un mayor deterioro del espacio europeo. La comunidad desvinculante solo conduce al arrinconamiento nocivo de unas cuantas voces altisonantes y fuera de lugar. Frente a eso me sigue pareciendo que la opción de un «republicanismo poshegemónico» está a la altura de los tiempos. Este republicanismo atiende a dos principios fundamentales, aunque tampoco se limitan a estos: 1. trabajar con coherencia sobre lo que está dado en la facticidad y en el sentido común en curso, y 2. sostener la división de poderes a cambio de un contrapeso que reduce la dominación sobre la vida del singular.

Por ahora, la gran incógnita es si Errejón y los errejonistas estarán en condiciones de armar un plan más o menos simultáneo con estos principios, o si se plegaran a la ilogicidad de Iglesias. Esto también convoca a preguntarse cómo quedarán los territorios. ¿Habilitará la nueva matriz organizativa espacios para disensos territoriales, o se solidificará el verticalismo desde arriba? Sin lo primero ese deseo de unidad oppositorum del pablismo será solo pulsión de muerte. Pero un paso del errejonismo no sería un paso de quiebre, sino que marcaría otro ritmo del ‘hacer’ en los territorios. A largo plazo esto podría tomar la forma de un nuevo federalismo.

Esta sería una hipótesis optimista. Es decir, quizás la humillante propuesta de Iglesias de ofrecerle a Errejón el Ayuntamiento de Madrid, tuvo un filo errejonista y llegaría a producir efectos que ni la camarilla de pablistas prevén. A la larga esto pudiera demostrar una vez más que para eso de ‘tomar el cielo por asalto’ no hay soga que sea tan larga. La ilogicidad que veía Chesterton en Lenin también implica eso: al final, esa soga siempre tiende a vencerse por uno de sus cabos.

 

 

Notas

*Imagen: Malagón Humor, Febrero 2017.

1.G. K. Chesterton. “The logic of Lenin”. The Collected Works of G.K. Chesterton (XXXI). Ignatius Press, 1989. 275-79.

2.http://www.eldiario.es/politica/DIRECTO-Vistalegre_13_611168880_9689.html

 

 

Respuesta a las respuestas de Alberto Moreiras. Por Gerardo Muñoz.

errejon-ilusion

En su segunda respuesta al comentario de Germán Cano, Alberto Moreiras hace una afirmación sobre posthegemonía con la cual queremos discrepar. Me permito citar ese momento hacia el final de su réplica, donde Moreiras escribe lo siguiente:

“Mi referencia es no solo la obra de Laclau, a la que me remito críticamente, sino también el trabajo que sobre ella están haciendo Yannis Stavrakakis y su grupo de Salónica. Son estos últimos los que establecen las condiciones mínimas del populismo en esos términos: transversalidad y antagonismo. Y a mí me parecen persuasivos. Sin esa base propiamente política en un populismo de condiciones mínimas…la posthegemonía se hace desdentada e irrelevante”.

Lo que me causa alarma en esa elaboración tan contundente: “sin base en un populismo la posthegemonía se hace desdentada e irrelevante”. ¿Por qué sería irrelevante la posthegemonía sin populismo? Acaso, ¿porque de esta manera lo ha venido elaborando Yannis Stravakakis y su grupo de Salónica? No, hay mucho más en juego en lo que afirma Moreiras. Para mí, lo que esta elaboración sugiere es una subordinación conceptual del republicanismo, mediante la coyuntura política, a la irrupción populista. Pero no hay razón para hacerlo más allá de la inmediatez coyuntural que es siempre pasajera. Yo podría decir, girando la mesa, que el populismo necesita de un republicanismo mínimo. Y que sin eso no habría nada por medio. De hecho, esta es la tesis que mueve muy ágilmente el hilo especulativo de En Defensa del Populismo (2016), de Carlos Fernández Liria. Pero no voy por ahí tampoco.

Me interesaría interpelar a Moreiras, pero también a Stravakakis indirectamente tomando en cuenta esa definición de populismo a partir de sus dos condiciones mínimas (transversalidad y antagonismo): ¿No estaríamos inflando un globo de aire que, como ha dicho en una conversación reciente el Profesor Jorge Yagüez, nos aleja de la precisión? ¿No se pierde especificidad conceptual y se deja de lado la materialidad real de tiempos posthegemónicos? Y si estas son las dos condiciones, ¿por qué no otras? Uno pudiera contra-argumentar diciendo que es porque hay un movimiento populista en curso, y que está dado en su formulación más feliz en el documento político de Errejón y su lista. Pero también habría una posibilidad alternativa, y es decir que la diferencia sustancial está en poner el acento en un republicanismo de fuerza, institucional, y de políticos vocacionales. Y ahí también caería la tesis de Carolina Bescansa, que pretende ignorar la pugna entre errejonistas e iglesistas rebajándola a una pelea de machos. Al contrario, estamos de acuerdo que aquí hay un problema de “error en la teoría”.

Ya de entrada, hablar de populismo confunde. Decir que puede haber populismo posthegemónico es una confusión al cubo. No hablo aquí de confusiones conceptuales o académicas, sino en el orden del discurso público, como el que circula en estos días por los medios españoles. Anoche veía la entrevista a Errejón en el programa “El Objetivo”, donde se hace muy visible las limitaciones retóricas de “entrar en razón” en cuanto a la diferencia entre errejonistas y pablistas. Y la verdad es que Errejón no hizo el mejor trabajo para desmarcase. Esa diferencia, como hemos dicho, es la hegemonía.

Pues bien, menciono esa entrevista, porque me parece que una parte fundamental de este debate pasa por la función retórica, si el objetivo es finalmente ganar votos y construir una gran mayoría capaz de desplazar el bipartidismo español. No le estoy pidiendo a Moreiras un lenguaje mediático ni nada por el estilo (¡estaría de más!), sino tan solo extrapolar un problema “real” que me parece análogo a este diferendo. Hablar claro (parraísticamente) es condición de posibilidad de la posthegemonía en última instancia. Y soy de los que cree que, al menos por el momento, no puede haber populismo de la ‘verdad’, como mismo no puede haber filosofía o pensamiento de “opinión”.

Voy al grano. A mí me parece que al decir “populismo anárquico” llegamos a confusiones aún mayores, a un callejón sin salida. Primero, porque los anarquistas piensan que has dado en la clave, y que se trata de armar una participación directa, más asamblearia, hasta llegar a trascender el capitalismo. Mientras que, por el otro lado, los populistas hegemónicos te toman como enfant terrible. Yo sigo siendo de los que piensa que las condiciones actuales son capaces de dejar desarrollar un discurso parraístico, esto es, republicano y necesariamente posthegemónico. Pero Moreiras escribe: “Si la posthegemonía es una contribución al pensamiento republicano, lo es sobre esa base populista mínima, pero también desde su antagonismo hacia todo verticalismo identitario y hacia todo identitarismo verticalizante”. Estamos de acuerdo en lo segundo, pero no necesariamente en lo primero.

El énfasis no lo pondría en ‘el populismo’, sino el pueblo, el We The People de la constitución viviente. No hay duda que, sin pueblo viviente, no hay transformación institucional capaz de atender las necesidades de cualquier presente. Pero esto ya deja atrás el populismo, porque el pueblo (en el populismo) siempre necesita apelar al líder. No así el republicanismo, cuyo pueblo solo tiene la materialidad de sus necesidades (siempre disímiles en cada época o momento), atendidas por  políticos de vocación, o lo que me gustaría llamar políticos posthegemónicos.

¿Hay populismo sin líder? Confieso ignorar si el grupo Populismus de Salónica ha desarrollado algún análisis sobre el liderazgo en el populismo (fuera de Laclau), pero tengo para mí que es ahí donde habría un verdadero ‘quiasmo interior’, muy similar al que se está produciendo hoy entre Iglesias y los errejonistas. Si el populismo requiere un líder, entonces esto implica que el populismo es solo un valor estratégico. Lo cual no está mal, pero no tiene por qué pretender agotar la posthegemonía. Yo diría de momento que mis dos condiciones para una democracia posthegemónica (no populista) serían: 1. un político poshegemónico (que J. L. Villacañas, siguiendo a Weber, llama de vocación), y 2. Institucionalidad (que es siempre más que instituciones estatales, y nunca republicanismo caduco).

Reinvención Democrática en España: Comentario a los documentos políticos de Íñigo Errejón y Pablo Iglesias en Vistalegre II. Por Gerardo Muñoz.

equipo-errejon-iglesias-2017

A pocos días de la Asamblea Ciudadana Vistalegre II (https://vistalegre2.podemos.info), es importante someter a debate y análisis algunas de las propuestas de renovación política de Podemos. Lo hago a distancia, sin presumir ser experto en política española, y deteniéndome en los documentos divulgados. En lo que sigue comento dos propuestas donde se juega, tanto en el plano teórico como político, una reinvención democrática con alcances para el espacio europeo. Podemos ha vuelto a reinstalar el problema de la legitimidad y de la evolución misma del progresismo en la región. En la primera parte comento el documento “Plan 2020” redactado por Pablo Iglesias. En la segunda, me detengo en el documento “Recuperar la ilusión”, de Íñigo Errejón, Clara Serra, y otros. Me acerco a estos dos documentos a partir de dos claves: la unidad y la transversalidad, aunque no pretendo en ningún caso agotar la discusión de estos documentos políticos, sino abrirla. En la última sección del texto, retomo algunos problemas relativos al futuro europeo. No hay dudas de que Podemos representa hoy el arco de lo que Albert O. Hirschman llamó el ‘prejuicio del optimismo’, a bias for hope.

Unidad

“Plan 2020” es el título de la propuesta de Pablo Iglesias, Carolina Bescansa, Juan Pablo Monedero, entre otros integrantes de equipos de trabajo. La primera parte del documento, aproximadamente las primeras veinte páginas, están dedicadas a trazar un derrotero de la política española desde la transición del 78, pasando por la crisis del 2008 y la irrupción del movimiento social 15M, y finalmente la apertura hacia la deriva electoral del 2014. El énfasis del recorrido, como es lógico, se hace sobre ese primer listón por el cual Podemos alcanzó resultados contundentes: un millón y medio de votos, además de cinco eurodiputados. Los resultados fueron una sorpresa para un partido joven, de poca experiencia, y cuya dirección estaba compuesta mayormente de docentes de la Universidad Complutense. Recuerdo que en el verano de ese año, en el marco del congreso “Literatura, Poshegemonía, Infrapolítica” que tuvo lugar en la Universidad Complutense, algunos de nosotros tuvimos la oportunidad de intercambiar ideas con Luis Alegre Zahonero, quien era entonces una de las figuras punteras del nuevo partido. Había expectativas, y se discutían ideas de republicanismo y ocupación del estado.

A distancia de esto, para Iglesias y los patrocinadores del “Plan 2020”, el 2008 da inicio a una ‘crisis de régimen’, caracterizada por una fuerte caída de legitimidad del status quo político español que podría poner patas arriba el precario ‘momento constituyente de los acuerdos del 78’, como lo caracteriza José Luis Villacañas [1]. En tiempos más recientes, esto se materializaba en la incapacidad, como ha notado Philip Pettit, del gobierno de Zapatero por dar frente a las fuerzas del capital financiero y mantener en control el índice de empleo [2]. Iglesias admite que lo central en su propuesta es la posibilidad de articular un momento constituyente para la reinvención del futuro democratico de la política española. El “Plan 2020” es claro su exposición un compromiso con la democracia sustrayéndose del momento populista más divulgado de la personality mediática de Iglesias y del lema radicalizado de “tomar el cielo por asalto”. Por el contrario, el documento Iglesias nos dice que el “Plan 2020” es una propuesta para construir con todos, apostando a la madurez institucional, aunque atenta al contramovimiento de una ciudadanía activa. Como leemos en el documento:

“Ese diálogo no puede estar guiado por el interés empresarial y tampoco desde intereses cortoplacistas electorales. El desarrollo industrial, el crecimiento de las ciudades, el mejoramiento del transporte, la construcción ecológica, las energías renovables, el gobierno europeo multinivel, las nuevas formas de gobierno electrónico, los efectos de la robotización de la economía…fórmula de ensayo general tiene una larga tradición en Inglaterra y permite ir construyendo perfiles políticos y técnicos para evitar las sorpresas de los nombramientos caprichosos a los que nos tiene acostumbrada la política turnista. Sirve igualmente para evitar la incertidumbre propia de un mundo global dominado por los poderes financieros. Y, en nuestro caso, tiene que servir para que las españolas y los españoles conozcan la alternativa de gobierno de Podemos.” (Plan 2020, 41).

Al tomar distancia de la gramática populista, se consigue generar momentos de honestidad y autocrítica en el tiempo que va del primer encuentro en Vistalegre al próximo. Iglesias reconoce las limitaciones discursivas y estratégicas que tuvieron a la hora de negociar con el PSOE, y dar la cara como fuerza democrática. Al hacer énfasis en una posible alianza, Iglesia intuye que habría voluntad de formar un pacto por una nueva transición no-presidencialista o no simplemente reducible al populismo de la “máquina electoral”. Sabemos que el gran politólogo Juan Linz leyó el ‘momento Suarez’ del 78 como un pacto entre élites que trajo a España a la democracia [3]. La llamada ‘nueva transición’ se haría cargo de este legado como momento constituyente en la vida política española. Pero más importante aun es el mensaje del “Plan 2020”. Iglesias parece decir algo así: si antes no intentamos hacer pactos, y ahora podemos hacerlo. Ahora, el fracaso caería sobre las espaldas de otros. Aunque las condiciones transicionales de hoy son distintas a las del 78, ya que ya no puede haber un “pacto de élites” a puertas cerradas. Mi intuición es que el documento de Iglesias es una manera de percibir que el momento del pacto ha terminado, y solo queda democratizar y ampliar Podemos para garantizar un momento constituyente.

El vórtice conceptual y propositivo del documento es la ‘unidad’. Al inicio, Iglesias y los redactores definen la ‘unidad’ como “voluntad unitaria, entendiendo la unidad como la capacidad de hacer que ideas distintas puedan complementarse, reforzando una dirección estratégica y unos objetivos comunes” (Plan 2020, 4). La idea de unidad en la diversidad sería el instrumento para construir “una nueva voluntad popular con todos”, y sostener una dialéctica entre movimiento e institución. Como escribe aforísticamente Iglesias: “lógica debe ser por tanto la de la unidad en la diversidad: un proyecto compartido por identidades políticas, sociales y territoriales diversas, donde lo que es una realidad en la cotidianeidad se articule en el ámbito de lo político” (Plan 2020, 29). El axioma de la unidad tiene como propósito una renovación de los cuadros políticos. De ahí que Iglesias diga que los políticos en Podemos dejarían de ser políticos para convertirse en militantes en la institución que velarían por el interés colectivo (Plan 2020, 24).

Son dos los modos de leer este diletantismo declarado. Por una parte, la ecuación de ‘militante al poder en la unidad’ es la quintaesencia del trancazo hegemónico en cuanto mediación verticalista, puesto que abandona la mesura de la vocación. Por otro lado, se pudiera entender la figura del militante institucional como representante de lo que algunos llaman un político del “estado activista” que logra compensar entre distintos niveles (Ayuntamiento, el movimiento social, la burocracia, y el Parlamento). En cualquiera de los dos casos interpretativos, para Iglesias el militante institucional vendría a renovar lo que él llama una “cartelización de la politica española” (Plan 2020, 39). La cuestión que está instalando Iglesias, sin embargo, también pasa por reestructurar la burocracia del estado (regulatory state) comprometido con la redistribución y la justicia social [4]. La articulación de la unidad se entiende como aspiración a la reelaboración de la fiscalización. Este fue un dilema que discutíamos hace un año atrás con Carolina Bescansa en la Universidad de Princeton [5]. En cambio, si por una unidad entendemos una lógica de subordinación hegemónica, entonces este posicionamiento remitiría no solo a la verticalización de la política, sino a lo que Carl Schmitt llama la intensificación entre amigo-enemigo. La variable de la unidad en Iglesias cobra aquí un tono categórico, puesto que la idea misma de ‘cumplir promesas’ (sic) tiene que aceptar de antemano este principio unitario (Plan 2020, 35). Este principio de la ‘unidad’ maximiza politización partisana y a la larga conduce a secuelas terminales y agónicas [6].

Iglesias sabe que no puede repetir el autoritarismo verticalista de la tradición del PCE. Y a la vez tampoco puede dejar las decisiones en la anti-política de las asambleas y del consenso horizontalista. Es de esta manera que el documento pone en un mismo renglón democracia, organicidad, y fuerza popular. El documento no nos da una reelaboración de cómo los que están fuera de los “círculos” podrían ser integrados, y cómo empalmar el resto externo a esa dialéctica ‘movimiento-institución militante’. Y esto es importante, puesto que es ese resto, un pueblo ausente, el que conviene tener del lado de Podemos si es que se quiere llegar a La Moncloa. No estoy diciendo con esto que se pueda hacer política de justicia social sin un pueblo. Al contrario, lo que quiero dejar claro es que el concepto de hegemonía, tal y como está elaborado en el posmarxismo de Ernesto Laclau, es insuficiente para dar cuenta de una forma verdaderamente transversal, heterogénea, y anti-unitaria, tal y como aparece hoy al interior de nuestras sociedades. ¿Cómo convencer a esos que están fuera de la movilización permanente? Hacia el final del documento, Iglesias habla de una programación a largo plazo de perfiles políticos (Plan 2020, 41). Para decirlo con José Luis Villacañas, aquí residiría el problema de la vocación de todo político’ [7].

Transversalidad

Pasamos ahora a comentar el documento “Recuperar la ilusión”, propuesto por Íñigo Errejón, Clara Serra, Pablo Bustinduy, y Rita Maestre. En este documento las metáforas importan. Según la clave de lectura que dio el filósofo German Cano, Podemos es como una embarcación que arrancó con un programa que pudo ‘darle una patada al tablero’, pero que ahora se propone la búsqueda de una capitanía que empuje a la embarcación sobre la incertidumbre de los mares [8]. Ese nuevo sailor, para Cano, sería Antonio Gramsci, aunque la idea está también implícita en el documento de Errejón. En efecto, el trabajo de integración y construcción en el documento se hace desde la teoría de la hegemonía en su formulación inspirada por Ernesto Laclau. Al igual que el “Plan 2020”, Errejón asume la autocrítica a la hora de construir el pueblo y dar un paso al frente en Vistalegre II. Los firmantes reconocen que hablar de pueblo con los convencidos de los Círculos es insuficiente, y por eso hace falta agregar a capas mayores, a quienes residen en las zonas rurales, a las mujeres, y a los que están en la brecha. Errejón afirma que es importante abandonar el “resistencialismo” (ser el Partido del anti-establishment) para formar una nueva mayoría capaz de aglutinarse bajo un nuevo sentido común (Recuperar la ilusión, 9).

Pero aquí es donde las similitudes con Iglesias terminan. Errejón dice que no se puede “rebobinar la Historia de España”, por lo que no hay posibilidad de alianzas que hagan perder el tiempo o llevar al desgaste. La tarea del nuevo político es ‘construir un pueblo’. “Construir el Pueblo” es, en efecto, el lema del documento, junto al dispositivo de la “transversalidad”. Aunque a diferencia del diálogo que Íñigo sostiene con Chantal Mouffe, en el documento hay un intento muy depurado por bajar de tono el schmittianismo agonista, moderándolo con un par de menciones dispersas [9]. Si para Iglesias la ‘unidad’ es el vórtice del éxito de un nuevo partido de mayorías, para Íñigo el énfasis recae en la transversalidad.

Conviene volver sobre qué está de fondo en la propuesta de la transversalidad. Al hablar de transversalidad, Errejón busca descentrar la unidad ideológica de la vieja izquierda como sujeto de emancipación. La transversalidad presupone que no hay tal sujeto redentor, y que en las nuevas condiciones sociales solo se consigue ganar políticamente con la construcción de una nueva mayoría. Como ha explicado el filósofo David Soto Carrasco, “la lógica [de la transversalidad] ha permitido a Podemos concretar transversalmente una organización que interpela a diferentes sectores de nuestra sociedad. Le ha dado cinco millones de votos que han permitido abrir una grieta en el muro…” (Soto Carrasco 2016). Pero la transversalidad siempre se nutre de identidades políticas en vibración, encarnadas, y administrables. El problema residiría, como ha visto Alberto Moreiras, en que la transversalidad es inconsistente con la lógica hegemónica [10]. Según Moreiras, la transversalidad en registro hegemónico termina siendo equivalencial en su capacidad estructural [11]. En cambio, lo que llamamos aquí ‘reinvención democrática’ intentaría ofrecer otro mecanismo que no estuviese estructurado con la equivalencia hegemónica que organiza y divide el ‘Pueblo’. Llamémosle a esto poshegemonía. Esta es una modalidad de pensar la reforma política, en un sentido fuerte, sin caer en la tentación de la organización identitaria. En mi réplica al artículo de Soto Carrasco sobre transversalidad sugerí que en realidad los nombres no importan mucho, sino en ‘nombre de qué’ se está hablando [12]. En otras palabras, el problema con la transversalidad es que presume que la identitarización de la lógica hegemónica agota el campo de lo social, cuya lógica maestra permite erigir un nuevo orden de dominación.

La propuesta de la transversalidad de Errejón, sin embargo, es importante en la medida en que facilita otro camino que no es ni el del ‘sujeto verdadero’ de la política convencional de izquierda, ni el de cesarismo carismático basado en la unidad [13]. De modo que solo asumiendo una forma republicana de la inequivalencia es que se puede llegar a la reinvención democrática [14]. Sin lugar a dudas, la transversalidad es el concepto más reiterado en el documento político de ‘Recuperar la ilusión’ a tal punto que hasta el deporte tiene que entenderse como ‘componente’ transversal (Recuperar la ilusión, 34). Esa es la propuesta constructiva, y la seña de identidad de los errejonistas. El corazón propositivo de ‘Recuperar la ilusión’ es doble: la creación de pueblo, y la fortificación de una fuerza de gobierno (Recuperar la ilusión, 18-20). En este nuevo contrato social, se intuye que se debe dar riendas a un momento constituyente exclusivo del constitucionalismo evolutivo:

“Para nosotros la tarea de «construir pueblo» es una tarea cultural, colectiva y desde abajo para generar afectos y esperanzas compartidas, para tejer y terminar con la fragmentación y la soledad. Un pueblo soberano es mucho más que una suma de electores o consumidores: es una comunidad voluntaria y consciente que se dota de instrumentos para una vida mejor. No hay nunca un momento tan fundante, tan fértil y tan revolucionario como el de We the People” (Recuperar la ilusión, 23).

Para ello Errejón se vincula más a una estructura federalista, con mayor compromiso en los municipios, en lugar de la dialéctica Estado-Círculo del “Plan 2020”. Y por esos los actores ejemplares de esta nueva política en curso son las alcaldesas Manuela Carmena en Madrid y Ada Colau en Barcelona. Esto es importante desde el punto de vista de la división de poderes, ya que el federalismo en cuanto proyecto de organización territorial busca atrofiar la concentración de poder. La reforma a la ley electoral que se propone en el documento es, en este sentido, consistente con este diseño (Recuperar la ilusión, 56-58). La fiscalización aparece desplegada también en diseño federal, si bien el documento vendría a ratificar una política de la reta básica universal como condición de una política de democratización equitativa [15].

Por último, es importante notar que Errejón hace una diferencia crucial entre dos tipos de crisis: crisis de estado y crisis de régimen. Según Errejón no hay crisis de estado en España, puesto que hay un orden de derecho, garantías, prensa libre, y división de poderes. Es una postura que está en las antípodas de miradas contemporáneas en la izquierda que siguen homologando el espacio del estado con el orden burgués que se tendría que llevar a la destrucción. El énfasis en la crisis de régimen permite hablar de relevos generacionales al interior de la institucionalidad, sin dar grandes saltos anti-jurídicos ni caer en extremismos. Este giro analítico de ver la crisis, debería entenderse en oposición a quienes defienden una postura asamblearia, o de participación obligatoria y directa, en línea una movilización total [16].

Las últimas páginas del documento destacan el valor de una transformación cultural (Recuperar la ilusión, 60-65). Pero habría que preguntarse, ¿por qué razón una transformación tendría que ser culturalista para lograr las dos tareas propuestas (construir un pueblo y alzar una fuerza de gobierno)? Convendría preguntar ¿por qué se habla de cultura y no de educación en un sentido más amplio? El culturalismo del documento recae en una ambigüedad insoluble. ¿Es el énfasis cultural seña de una textura que quiere hegemonía? Sobre esa trama queremos derivar algunos elementos en nuestra conclusión.

Democracia poshegemónica en el contexto europeo

Aunque hemos visto algunas de las diferencias importantes que distancian teórica y prácticamente las propuestas de Iglesias y Errejón, también hay que explicitar lo que las une: un acuerdo con la teoría de la hegemonía. No es solo una cuestión desde el punto de vista intelectual, esto es, relativa a la pertinencia de la obra de Antonio Gramsci o Ernesto Laclau en las elaboraciones de los documentos, sino que es algo más. Si para Iglesias la ‘unidad’ es un dispositivo de cerrar fila y blindar su liderazgo dentro del partido; la ‘transversalidad’ propuesta por Errejón es una atravesar y dividir el campo de lo social a través de la politización. Visto desde arriba, Iglesias emerge como el líder que cierra el círculo (la figura del cono, que es también como lo propone el pensador Carlos Fernández Liria en su libro En Defensa del Populismo). Y desde abajo, Errejón tira de la transversalidad para armar una articulación que exige la identidad y la diferencia, cuyo costo es la democracia a largo plazo. El gramscianismo humanista contemporáneo en estas dos bifurcaciones solo podrían llevar a formulaciones cortoplacistas. El resultado de su déficit ha sido ya comprobado en el llamado ‘ciclo progresista latinoamericano’, cuya fragilidad no pudo dar riendas de largo plazo a procesos que comenzaron a sentir los efectos de la caída del precio de los commodities en el nuevo ciclo económico global [17]. Si la cartografía latinoamericana fue un tipo ideal para el ascenso de Podemos, ya no puede serlo.

Los tiempos han cambiado. Además, no hay que olvidar que la realidad institucional española es desigual a la porosidad de países como Argentina, Bolivia, o Ecuador donde el momento caliente de la política plebeya coagula condiciones constituyentes. En un momento en el cual la extrema derecha nacionalista ha llegado a decir que busca apropiarse de Gramsci, Podemos necesita pasar a una teoría instituyente y poshegemónica [18]. Esto evidencia que caer en ese juego solo puede llevar a una batalla del más fuerte, donde el populismo nacionalista de derechas (y más ahora con el triunfo de Donald Trump en los Estados Unidos) siempre estaría en condiciones de ganar. Diríamos más: el gramscianismo ya está en procesos de conversión anti-político con Le Pen, Beppe Grillo, o Frauke Petry.

El populismo hegemónico siempre será un atajo y una cuartada entre la política de los afectos y la anti-política, pero no puede garantizar longevidad de una democracia a escala regional o federal, tal y como se espera hoy en el gran espacio europeo. Y si con ‘hegemonía gramsciana’ solo identificamos un flanco ideológico, su postura quedaría reducida al “resistencialismo” denunciado como insuficiente por Errejón en su documento ‘Recuperar la Ilusión’. Hay que dar otro paso. La poshegemonía abre la posibilidad de seguir avanzando en la construcción democrática, deliberativa, y transversal con solidez institucional para articular una gran política nacional y europea. En este sentido, la democracia poshegemónica renuncia a la oferta de la movida populista como el camino más corto para avivar a sociedades atizadas por la tecnocracia, así como por los consensos supra-económicos de la Unión Europea.

El futuro político de Podemos está en el medio de una encrucijada. Por el lado estatal-nacional, tienen que seguir desarrollando una madurez de vocación política capaz de organizar un nuevo consenso social de alcance territorial, y con una voluntad de llegar al poder de mando. Por otro lado, la realidad exige una elaboración compleja con el entramado federal de la Union Europea. Y esto no se puede obviar ni zanjar de manera irresponsable. Por eso las apuestas de contramovimiento democrático son, en un sentido estricto, un plano en el cual Podemos tendría que insertar o al menos entablar un diálogo [19]. Hay que recordar, con Davide Tarizzo, que no hay posibilidad de desprendimiento de la UE que garantice una orientación democrática longeva [20]. Puesto que toda ruptura de la unión, todo desprendimiento de la ‘hospitalidad europea’ federal, solo llevaría a una pauperización de las realidades nacionales, al descenso aun mayor de la calidad de vida, y al brote de las peores pasiones xenófobas o antiinmigrantes en detrimento de la hospitalidad europea.

¿Cómo moverse en ambos registros de comunidad y conseguir un contramovimiento político democrático? Esto es mucho más delicado, ya que hay que recordar que la historia reciente europea no da un salto del estado nación a la Unión Europea, sino desde la crisis imperial a la integración. Aunque ya hoy, la promesa imperial es solo nostalgia que la Francia de Le Pen, la Inglaterra de May, o la Holanda de Wilders jamás podrían cumplir. Esa promesa es solo la trampa para un rumbo que será peor. Si la promesa del populismo de derecha se basa en un pasado orgulloso sin imperio, la promesa del populismo de izquierda es la de una hegemonía sin democracia duradera. Cuando decimos poshegemonía aludimos a la posibilidad concreta de reparar esto último. Si Podemos es una de las posibilidades deseables para una reinvención democrática europea, tiene que dejar atrás la insistencia en la hegemonía como parlante de las grandes mayorías. A Podemos le esperan retos mayores, pero más importante aun se le impone la posibilidad de un new deal al interior de esta segunda globalización. Y nuestro deseo es que estén a la altura.

Notas

*Documentos: Pablo Iglesias. “Podemos Para Todas. Plan2020: ganar al Partido Popular, Gobernar España”. Íñigo Errejon, “Recuperar la ilusión: Desplegar las velas, un Podemos para gobernar”. Pueden ser consultados aquí: https://vistalegre2.podemos.info/documentos/

  1. José Luis Villacañas. “Una historia del poder en España: prácticas, hábitos y estilos políticos”. Seminario en la Fundación Juan March, Marzo de 2014.
  2. Philip Pettit. “Republican reflections on the 15-M movement”. Gabriel Entine y Jeanne Moissand (eds.), Debates en torno al 15-M. Republicanismo, democracia y participación política. Paris: La Vie des Idées, 2011.
  3. Juan Linz. “The Perils of Presidentialism” (Journal of Democracy, 1990, 51-69).
  4. Aunque empiricamente basado en el contexto norteamericano, el trabajo más reciente de Seebel Rahman es crucial para abrir una discusión de los documentos y su alcance para la burocracia fiscal española. Ver, Kan Seebel Rahman. Democracy against domination (Oxford University Press, 2016).
  5. Carolina Bescansa en la Universidad de Princeton: https://podemos.info/carolina-bescansa-expone-en-princeton-las-claves-politicas-y-sociales-de-podemos/
  6. En su importante ensayo “Ética de Estado y Estado pluralista” (1930), Carl Schmitt define la unidad como el grado más intensivo de la diferencia entre amigo-enemigo”: “En verdad lo político sólo designa el grado de intensidad de una unidad. La unidad política puede por tanto tener y abrazar en sí diferentes contenidos. Pero ella designa siempre el grado más intensivo de una unidad, a partir de la cual también se determina la distinción más intensiva, a saber, la agrupación de amigos y enemigos. La unidad política es la unidad suprema, y no porque dictamine todopoderosamente o porque nivele a las demás unidades, sino porque es la que decide y porque puede evitar que dentro de ella todas los demás agrupaciones sociales se disocien hasta la enemistad extrema (esto es, hasta la guerra civil)”. Logos. Anales del Seminario de Metafísica, Vol.44, 2011, p.34.
  7. José Luis Villacañas escribe al respecto: “Integrar a otros políticos profesionales o vocacionales siempre es un mérito en política, desde luego. Pero su eficacia dependerá de si al frente hay un político vocacional en este sentido. Sin embargo, todavía nos queda lo más importante del político vacacional: la responsabilidad en el uso del poder. Para tenerla, y más allá de la pasión, el político vocacional debe ser frío como el témpano y mantener el pathos de la distancia. Pasión ardiente y mesurada frialdad, ese es el complejo psiquismo del político vocacional”. Ver, “Weber y Podemos”. El País, 15 de Enero de 2017.
  8. German Cano. “Podemos, segunda singladura”. El País, 26 de Enero de 2017.
  9. Íñigo Errejón y Chantal Mouffe. Construir un Pueblo: Hegemonía y Radicalización de la Democracia (Icaria, 2016).
  10. Alberto Moreiras. “Comentario a ‘Una patada al tablero’, de David Soto Carrasco”. https://infrapolitica.wordpress.com/2016/05/18/comentario-a-una-patada-al-tablero-de-david-soto-carrasco-por-alberto-moreiras/. El artículo de Soto Carrasco: http://www.eldiario.es/murcia/murcia_y_aparte/patada-tablero_6_516958335.html
  11. La crítica al principio general de equivalencia aparece en el ensayo de Jean-Luc Nancy Vérité de la démocratie (Galilée, 2008). También ha sido elaborado en relación con la cuestión de la poshegemonía por Alberto Moreiras en “Infrapolitical Action: The Truth of Democracy at the End of General Equivalence” (Politica Común, Vol.9, 2016).
  12. Gerardo Muñoz. “Podemos, ¿en nombre de qué? Transversalidad y Democracia”. https://infrapolitica.wordpress.com/2016/05/19/podemos-en-nombre-de-que-transversalidad-y-democracia-gerardo-munoz/
  13. Manolo Monereo. “Podemos: el final de la inocencia”. Cuarto Poder, 25 de Diciembre de 2016.
  14. Jorge Álvarez Yágüez. “Breve nota a la transversalidad”. https://infrapolitica.wordpress.com/2016/05/23/breve-nota-a-transversalidad/
  15. Errejón ha hecho explícito su compromiso con medidas de renta básica universal, incluso por encima de lo que ya se ha acordado recientemente en el Parlamento español. Para un debate contemporáneo sobre el tema, ver Philippe Van Parijs. Basic Income: A Radical Proposal for a Free Society and a Sane Economy (Harvard University Press, 2017).
  16. La propuesta asamblearia o de horizontalismo político, está asociada con el trabajo de activistas sociales como Raúl Zibechi, Raúl Sánchez Cedillo, o Amador Fernández Savater. De este último ver su crítica a la figura política de Iglesias: “Un mundo restringido. Comentario al discurso de Pablo Iglesias”. eldiario, 26 de Octubre, 2016.
  17. Gerardo Muñoz (ed.). “The End of the Latin American Progressive Cycle” (Special Issue). Alternautas Journal (3.1, Julio de 2016). http://las.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2016/11/Alternautas_End-of-Progressive-Cycle-Dossier-2016.pdf
  18. Ver, “Okupa Gramsci: la derecha española quiere adoptar al pensador de cabecera de Podemos”, El Confidencial, 24 de Enero 2017. David Soto Carrasco también ha argumentado, en línea con nuestra discusión, un desplazamiento más allá del ‘momento populista’. Ver su artículo titulado “Debates y demandas” (http://www.eldiario.es/murcia/murcia_y_aparte/Debates-demandas_6_554754541.html).
  19. Es aquí donde pudiera someterse a discusión la propuesta de un movimiento de democratización de la zona europea, propuesta por el ex-ministro de economía de Grecia, Yannis Varoufakis (Democracy in Europe Movement 2025). Curiosamente el documento político de Varoufakis, siendo el mismo un economista, es muchísimo menos detallado y directo que los documentos de Errejón e Iglesias que hemos comentado. Giorgio Agamben también ha llamado la atención a la carencia de legitimidad de la UE en su artículo “Que l’Empire Latin contre-attaque!” (Libération, 24 de Marzo 2013).
  20. David Tarizzo. “Después del euro: soberanía nacional y hospitalidad europea”. Res Publica: Revista de Historia de las Ideas Politicas, Vol.18, N.1, 2015. p.125-140. Esta también es la duda que ha notado el constitucionalista Bruce Ackerman en cuanto a la crisis de la UE y el two-tier system. Véase su “Three Paths to Constitutionalism: the Crisis of the European Union” (B.J.Pol.S. 45, 705–714).

El quiasmo en Podemos. Por Alberto Moreiras.

th

Uno de los problemas de aceptar la teoría de la hegemonía como marco exhaustivo del debate es tener también que aceptar lo que Ernesto Laclau llamaba “los fundamentos retóricos de la sociedad,” con sus secuelas inevitablemente sofísticas y antiparrésicas.   El político embarcado en la obsesión de “construir pueblo,” es decir, de construir hegemonía, no puede sino intentar acertar con la expresión que de suelo a un efecto de equivalencia, redefinible como catexis de identificación afectiva.   La retórica impera en esta táctica a expensas de la más sobria voluntad de decir la verdad—no se trata de que el hegemónico necesariamente mienta, sino más bien de que su voluntad de verdad está cruzada inevitablemente por una estrategia de disimulación, en la que lo disimulado es cualquier pulsión no susceptible de catexis identificatoria. El político populista apuesta por la comunidad, nunca por la separación. El espacio político hegemónico es siempre simulacro de comunidad, quizá en la esperanza vaga de que el simulacro se asiente en comunidad auténtica. La separación, como efecto necesario de la palabra verdadera (el que dice solo la verdad lo hace desde su soledad incompartible, desde aquello que en él no es comunitario ni busca catexis), es irreducible a práctica hegemónica o hegemonizante.

Hace unas semanas, cuando empezaba a perfilarse al menos públicamente la confrontación de posiciones entre Pablo Iglesias e Iñigo Errejón que iba a establecer las coordenadas para la reconfiguración del partido en Vistalegre 2, Iglesias le escribe a Errejón, o más bien le escribe al público con Errejón como pretexto de interlocución, una “Carta abierta a Iñigo” (cf. 20 minutos, 12 de diciembre 2016). En ella Iglesias habla de amistad, de “echarse unas risas,” de compañerismo e intimidad, pero se preocupa, dice, porque “quizás eso no dure siempre.”   Iglesias da un paso atrás, dice darlo, y le promete a Errejón que esta su carta pública, su carta abierta, no es la carta de “tu secretario general,” sino que es la carta de “tu compañero y amigo.”   La catexis identificatoria está implícita como propuesta para todo lector de la carta que tenga compañeros y amigos sin tener necesariamente secretarios generales al mando. Ah, qué bien, aquí no habrá autoridad, solo reflexiones íntimas. Eso me decían a mí mis tutores en el colegio, también decían hablar desde la amistad pura, y yo, por supuesto, les creía, cómo no creerles sin traicionar la amistad que yo mismo sentía.

Pero no hay que leer las cartas siempre desde la sospecha, eso está mal entre amigos y compañeros. Iglesias le da unas lecciones fraternales a Errejón, y le dice que se “enorgullece” de seguir siendo su candidato a secretario general, pero que no le es posible aceptar la separación que propone Errejón entre “proyectos y personas.” Esto es claro: si Errejón propone que la candidatura de Iglesias a la secretaría general no será amenazada, Iglesias le avisa con sinceridad amable de que a él le iba a resultar muy difícil, como a todo el mundo, ser el líder de un partido sin mando real, es decir, tener que liderar sobre las ideas y los equipos de otros.   Es perfectamente entendible y lógico. Así que Iglesias invita a Errejón a un “debate fraterno” que permita en última instancia “lograr la mayor integración de todos los proyectos.” Pero, Iñigo, no me pidas “que desvincule mi papel de secretario general de mis ideas.”   Creo que eso es lo esencial en la carta, que termina diciendo “quiero un Podemos en el que tus ideas y tu proyecto tengan espacio, del mismo modo que los de otros compañeros como Miguel y Teresa. Quiero un Podemos en el que tú, uno de los tipos con más talento y brillantez que he conocido, puedas trabajar a mi lado y no frente a mí.” “A mi lado y no frente a mí,” puesto que yo soy el secretario general, y te quiero a mi lado, porque soy generoso, no por debajo, no obedeciendo, no mandando tampoco (no me impongas tus ideas, respétame las mías), sino en tu lugar cabal, en el lugar que corresponde a alguien que no es secretario general y que así no ocupa el papel del líder. Hay líderes, y hay otros que no lo son tanto. Y el lugar natural de los que no lo son tanto en una organización política es al lado de sus líderes, no discutiendo con ellos. Eso manda malas señales, y confunde las catexis de la gente.

Me gustaría analizar la estructura que inmediata e infernalmente se crea a través de esta carta—pero la carta es solo síntoma de un estado de cosas, el estado de cosas hoy en Podemos y en la democracia española, y a ello nos remitimos, con respeto para ambos lados, entendiendo plenamente la enorme dificultad de la política, la dignidad de la política en cuanto actividad humana siempre elusiva en su verdad, siempre notoriamente esquiva.   Errejón reclama—ha reclamado, antes de la carta, como condición de la carta—su derecho a proponer listas a la dirección de Podemos mediante las que se encarne necesariamente una diferencia de ideas en la dirección misma. Errejón reclama un principio de pluralidad en el centro del poder de Podemos, algo perfectamente compatible con la teoría de la hegemonía. Errejón reclama, en otras palabras, que el significante vacío, encarnado en el secretario general, sea realmente un significante vacío, y así susceptible de ser llenado, fantasmática, retórica, ilusoriamente, por una multiplicidad de demandas cuya concreción—es decir, cuya jerarquización, cuya victoria o derrota, cuya significación en cuanto demandas—sería ya harina de otro costal, entregada a negociaciones siempre intensas a partir de la aceptación de que el conflicto es inevitable y siempre irreducible en política, sobre todo en política democrática.  Para que mis demandas sean oídas, Pablo, le dice Errejón, es necesario que tengan la visibilidad adecuada, y eso me obliga a proponer listas alternativas a las tuyas a partir de un conflicto que no podemos negar. Solo quiero que mis demandas estén, no quiero que me desaparezcan, aunque también quiera que tú continues siendo mi jefe, sigas al mando, sigas en el papel que ya otras demandas y sus cadenas de equivalencias te han otorgado, retórica y efectivamente.

E Iglesias le contesta, no menos lógica y razonablemente, que él, aunque sea, en cuanto secretario general, no más que un significante vacío, no puede vivir como significante vacío ni quiere ser significante vacío. Y no le gusta que otros, tú mismo, Iñigo, intenten aprovechar su calidad teórica de significante vacío para convertirlo realmente en un significante vacío, desrealizado, inerte, marioneta de las ideas de otros, y así ya incapaz de, como dice la carta, decir “ciertas verdades como puños,” excepto en calidad de consejero delegado, hablando por otros, como el muñeco del ventrilocuo. Pero entonces esas verdades ya no serán puños, serán simulacro de puños, serán meros artilugios retóricos. ¿Y cómo objetar a esto?

Es un quiasmo.  En el contexto de la teoría de la hegemonía funciona la contraposición entre el que dice su verdad en separación y el que la dice buscando articulación comunitaria.  El quiasmo entre Iglesias y Errejón es que ninguno de ellos puede renunciar a ninguno de esos dos registros, por razones en sí contrapuestas. La articulación retórica comunitaria paraliza y moviliza a Iglesias y la verdad parréstica en separación paraliza y moviliza a Errejón.  Se trama una figura retórica que puede quedar bien en el terreno de la poética, incluso de la poética política, pero que, como todo quiasmo, resulta existencialmente invivible. Ni Errejón puede aceptar el disciplinamiento del silencio—pliégate, Iñigo, no es el momento de imponer tus ideas, nunca será el momento de imponer tus ideas, hasta que seas el líder, olvidémonos de Vistalegre 2 y de la Asamblea Ciudadana, sabes, como lo supiste ya en Vistalegre 1, que la Asamblea Ciudadana es solo un momento más en la estrategia de catexis, en la estrategia de construir hegemonía, y tus ideas pueden jodernos, pueden romper la armonía hegemónica, pueden dividir al pueblo, pueden destruir el aparato—ni Iglesias puede aceptar la mordaza—aguántate, Pablo, tú quisiste ser un hiperlíder mediático, quisiste construirte como jefe solo en aras de tu capacidad retórica, de tu carisma parlante, aténte a eso, no trates de tapar la proliferación de ideas y propuestas, no trates de tapar las mías, la Asamblea Ciudadana es un momento necesario en la estrategia de catexis, y tus ideas pueden jodernos, pueden romper la armonía hegemónica, pueden dividir al pueblo, pueden destruir el aparato.

La situación—sostenerse en el quiasmo es existencialmente invivible, no ya para Errejón e Iglesias, sino para todos los inscritos en Podemos, que no encuentran forma de conciliar las posiciones pero saben que los votos que decidan serán votos que separen, saben que la situación tiene arreglo imposible, que solo la victoria de unos decidirá la derrota de otros, pero que la victoria será pírrica, y la derrota no será definitiva—no se zanja con “documentos políticos.”   El lector tanto de “Recuperar la ilusión,” que es la propuesta del equipo de Errejón, como de “Plan 2020,” que es la propuesta redactada por Iglesias, puede leer entre líneas diferencias que son solo administraciones de énfasis, variaciones retóricas sobre temas similares, y lo que queda es una difusa sensación de incompatibilidad fantasmática, es decir, no basada en ningún desacuerdo explícito, tangible.   La retórica misma, por los dos lados, busca unidad, y lima las diferencias, que quedan referidas solo al mayor predominio de buscar transversalidad en “Recuperar la ilusión” o de buscar unidad en “Plan 2020,” pero de forma que todos entienden como políticamente precaria, puesto que ni la transversalidad ni la unidad se consiguen en los documentos, sino en la práctica política cotidiana.

¿No es hora, ya, de dar un paso atrás, y de considerar que, si los presupuestos teóricos que han sostenido el curso de Podemos han llevado a este impasse, es hora de cambiar los presupuestos teóricos? Cuando uno no puede resolver un problema, conviene estudiar el problema, y cambiar sus coordenadas.   En ese sentido, me gustaría proponer solo dos cosas:

  1. Ni Pablo Iglesias es un significante vacío ni debería permitirse jugar a serlo. La figura del lider sostenida en la teoría del significante vacío produce el impasse de Podemos.  Iglesias debe renunciar a su auto-mantenimiento como líder de Podemos en aras de su carisma mediático, hoy maltrecho por otro lado. Si Iglesias ha de seguir siendo secretario general, que lo sea porque gana en votos, sin más consideraciones, sin más dramas, sin más creación artificial de ficciones teóricas insostenibles.  Iglesias debe aceptar su verdad como sujeto político y renunciar a su autorrepresentación primaria como significante vacío y receptor de deseo.  De esa manera podrá volver a tener “amigos y compañeros” y no más bien sumisos o insumisos.
  1. Y Errejón debe aceptar que ninguna transversalidad sustantiva es compatible con la teoría de la hegemonía, que la disuelve en equivalencia.   La transversalidad es la apuesta por un populismo an-árquico, a-verticalista, en el que la figura del líder no tiene más consistencia que la del gestor de los intereses de sus votantes. La ruptura posthegemónica–y esa es en el fondo la deriva de Errejón desde las elecciones de junio de 2016–es necesariamente la renuncia a la articulación retórica comunitaria como horizonte primario del discurso político.  La transversalidad reconoce la separación como condición constitutiva del discurso político.  Errejón ya está en ello, pero le falta recordar que no hay transversalidad si la transversalidad se afirma solo para ser mejor capturada en recuperación comunitaria.

Quizás sea necesario esperar a la emergencia de un Podemos anarco-populista, posthegemónico, antiverticalista.   Todo el programa real de Podemos podría potenciarse fuertemente desde esos presupuestos.   Es la teoría de la hegemonía la que crea el impasse presente. Veremos qué pasa la semana que viene, aunque la votación ya ha empezado.   Modestamente, como mero inscrito, sin militancia, imagino que será más fácil esa recomposición teórica a partir de la victoria de las listas de Recuperar la ilusión.

Good riddance! Apuntes sobre Marranismo e Inscripción. (Sara Nadal-Melsió)

Marranismo e Inscripción (Escolar y Mayo, 2016) traza un itinerario en tres estadios, cada uno marcado por efectos narrativos de sujeto que se descomponen en cada uno de sus tramos, como huellas borradas: la autobiografía/autografía intelectual, la entrevista-conversación, el ensayo teórico, la lectura interesada. En su centro aparece un dispositivo y un cálculo en los que el pensamiento se narra como huida para terminar convertido, en su tránsito por la escritura, en causa y razón, en militancia incluso. La autografía, la escritura como inscripción, permite a Moreiras, permutar la narrativa de un sujeto académico plenamente interpelado por la institución por una práctica de lo propio desde su afuera. Su propuesta se nos presenta como una táctica de apropiación de lo que se mantiene externo a la institución: la existencia y su facticidad, lo absolutamente singular en su contingencia.

Así la escritura de propio, el autografismo del marrano, se externaliza para convertirse en herramienta de transmisión no circunscrita ya ni a la enseñanza ni al saber; enfrentada a la producción de consenso a la que tiende el aparato académico y a su reducción de la transmisión a enseñanza, saber y disciplina. La institución no puede interpelar a lo propio, en tanto lo propio es un ejercicio de singularidad que no pertenece a la narrativa de sujeto. Lo propio funciona en el texto como un enigma estructurante. Moreiras es el enigma y el no-sujeto que se escribe frente a nuestros ojos mientras se descose como académico, como miembro de la institución y acatador de sus leyes.

Lo que transmite aquí Moreiras es la fidelidad a una idea impersonal que excede al sujeto. Se trata de un cálculo que está ahí desde el principio como intuición y que sólo puede vivirse como error o falta. Diría incluso que esa impersonalidad está en el centro de la tragedia académica a la que se alude como trauma del sujeto. La academia solo acepta y produce sujetos plenamente interpelados, todo lo demás simplemente no existe. En ese sentido es una estructura schmittiana de gobierno, no solo de amigo/enemigo, sino de sujeto y no-sujeto. El no-sujeto de lo impersonal no tiene cabida en su seno pero es también justamente el exceso impersonal lo que sobrevive a su tragedia, a la pérdida del cobijo académico y su producción de identidades.

Esta impersonalidad, anclada en el centro de un texto personalísimo, reclama un más allá de la voz que nos habla, nos cuenta y reflexiona sobre su insomnio, su desenganche del sujeto académico y de su falso cobijo. Maurice Blanchot tenía muy claro que escribir equivale a pasar de la primera a la tercera persona. Y esa tercera persona es también el lugar que Roberto Esposito describe como “la vela alucinada del insomnio” en Tercera persona: política de la vida y filosofía de lo impersonal. Cito:

“…no el yo que vela en la noche, sino la noche que vela dentro del yo despojándose de su rol de sujeto, de su identidad de persona, de su capacidad de imputación. Un acontecimiento, llegado desde afuera y dirigido hacia fuera, que se sitúa en un nivel completamente exterior respecto a la esfera personal de la conciencia.” (Esposito, 187).

El insomnio que acecha el subtítulo de Marranismo e inscripción: ‘Más allá de la conciencia desdichada’ alude a una escena originaria en la que la pérdida es aún solo eso. La lucha agónica y especular entre la primera y la segunda persona de “Mi vida en Z”, su tragedia, queda a lo largo del texto definitivamente desplazada en favor de una tercera persona que es a la vez singular y plural, ya que se relaciona con el mundo a través de su diferencia y nunca de su identidad interpelada. La solución está no solo en asumir la pérdida sino en celebrarla. El proceso no es reversible porque la lógica ternaria es irreducible ya a la binaria. No hay vuelta atrás: adiós a la conciencia desdichada. Good riddance!

El dispositivo teórico de Marranismo e inscripción demanda una estructura triple, liberada finalmente del agonismo trágico del diálogo a dos bandas (la lucha a muerte entre el tú y el yo que la institución demanda). A mi personalmente este dispositivo me recuerda un poco a la passe lacaniana, que es también la inscripción de la voz de la tercera persona, un salto de la tragedia a la política de la comedia, a su picaresca, a su ‘make-do’ con lo dado. Así, la relación central del texto, la relación entre vida y pensamiento, bios y logos, deja también de ser binaria una vez aceptamos que ni la una ni la otra coinciden con la subjetividad y sus trampas. La vida pensante que ejerce el “moralismo salvaje” propuesto por Moreiras solo puede ser impersonal, cómplice con la facticidad del mundo y su exterioridad.

En la textualidad misma de Marranismo e inscripción se produce otra no coincidencia, esta vez entre la letra y la voz, la aporía en la que texto se instala. El desborde producido por la voz propia amenaza con descoser la continuidad de la letra y su capacidad de construir una opción de lenguaje subjetiva. La singularidad de la voz es un índice de su exterioridad: la voz es siempre otra. Y escuchar la voz en la letra es desdoblar su identidad y su identificación monológica. La voz es siempre marrana y la cuestión es cómo sostener esa tonalidad en el acto de la escritura. Es ahí donde la picaresca de la voz de Alberto actúa como soporte de su marranismo, como antídoto a la institucionalización de su escritura.

Asimismo, asumir el accidente del marranismo (el “no querer estar nunca allí donde lo ponen”, 49) es un acto de voluntad política y una entrada en un mundo más allá del yo que demanda la incorporación de lo ajeno como propio. Se trata pues de un acto retroactivo que señala la extraversión como momento de inflexión; inscripción que transmuta la necesidad en elección, lugar al que sólo se llega después de pasar por el desierto y verse de bruces enfrentada a lo que no es “ni inagotable ni subsumible” (Moreiras, 56): la existencia como resto y como supervivencia. Algo que convierte a la precariedad de la superviviente, que sabe bien de la fragilidad del sujeto como cobijo, en condición voluntaria desde la que iniciar un ergon propio. Una práctica de no-sujeto que ponga a trabajar el tiempo exterior de la existencia, su singular facticidad, la de una vida no intercambiable con ninguna otra.

 

*Position Paper read at book workshop “Los Malos Pasos” (on Alberto Moreiras’ Marranismo e Inscripción), held at the University of Pennsylvania, January 6, 2017.

‘Chasing the hare with the ox, swimming against the swelling tide’: Towards a Posthegemonic Institutionality. (Gerardo Muñoz)

*(Paper read at the workshop “Left Behind: The Ends of Latin America’s Left Turns”, held at Simon Fraser University, December 5, 2016. Organized by Jon Beasley-Murray.)

In an important moment of Alberto Moreiras’ new book Marranismo e inscripción (2016) we read: “La sospecha de no ser lo suficiente correctos en política, con todo el misterio terrífico que esa determinación tiene en la academia [norteamericana], pesó siempre sobren nuestras cabezas como una grave espada de Damocles y todavía pesa…” (Moreiras 125). It might be a good ocassion to say upfront that the waning of the progressive cycle in Latin America will most likely revive old affective demands and well-known pieties that the Left never affords to give up. Someone will be blamed for the broken plates, and the burden of those “left behind”. But this moment should be seized to think not what ‘politics’ should or must do (in Latin America and beyond), but rather how to think politics in what already is taking place. Or to question if perhaps the political today amounts to nothing more than what Arnaut Daniel said of the poet: “[He] chases the hare with the ox, swims against the swelling tide”. Can the paralysis of politics be something other than hunting or resistance?

As this 2016 comes to a close, we have witnessed a series of drawbacks in the political landscape of Latin America: from the outcome of the referendum in Bolivia to the electoral victory of Mauricio Macri’s PRO in Argentina, not to speak of Dilma Rousseff parliamentary impeachment in Brazil. There has been other lesser-known events, although no less disturbing, such as Roxana Pey’s arbitrary dismissal as First President of Universidad de Aysén by the current Chilean Minister of Culture after proposing a debt free and non-corporate public education. The sense of ‘exhaustion’ is at the thicket of the progressive cycle and has only deepened in the last two years, although this prognosis is more than just a motto of ‘ultra-leftistism’. Recently, high profile figures of the so-called Pink Tide governments have also voiced a sense of political stagnation and defunct space to reignite the original rhythm that took place at the turn of the century.

Just about a week ago, in a conversation that took place at Columbia University between philosopher Étienne Balibar and Vice-President of Bolivia Alvaro Garcia Linera, the latter stated that we are now in turbulent times where no horizon is in clear sight. It might be true that the unsettling remark might have partly been influenced in the wake of Fidel Castro’s death as the symptom of Latin American Left’ symbolic orphanhood, although Castro died far from leaving a relevant political legacy. I think many will agree that the guerrilla warfare, the Partido Único, or the concept of ‘struggle’ plays no role in the future of the Latin American Lefts. Yet such announcement from the Vice-President of the Bolivian Plurinational State seems to put to a halt the deep political conviction for transformation that he himself theorized in a wide range of orienting categories such as ‘creative contradictions’, ‘planetary ayllu’, or ‘communist horizon’.

The deficiency of a visible political vista means that we are in times of interregnum; a time when the modern epochality is left behind and a new one that has yet to materialize. The interregnum describes an extraneous temporality that fissures the antinomies of architectonics of modern politics – autorictas and potestas, constituent and constituted power, legitimacy and legality – carrying the very economy between thought and action in a threshold of indeterminacy. At the closure of epochality we are obliged to rethink once again the limits of the Latinamericanist conditions of reflection in light of the contemporary transformation of the space or object of knowledge that we call Latin America. A few years ago, John Beverley made an attempt to propose a new paradigm in his Latinamericanism after 9/11 (2011) under the preliminary notion of post-subalternism, which he defined as an alliance between subaltern and the new progressive State:

“The question of Latinamericanism is, ultimately, a question of the identity of the Latin American state…I would like to suggest here an alternative that is post-subaltenrist, ‘post’ in the sense that it displaces the subaltenrist paradigm but is also a consequence of that paradigm in that it involves rethinking the nature of the state and of the national popular from the perspectives opened by subaltern studies. …This possibility has a double dimension: how can the state itself be radicalized and modified as a consequence of bringing into it demands, values, experiences from the popular subaltern sectors, and how, in turn, from the state, can society can be remade in a more redistributive, egalitarian, culturally diverse way (how hegemony might be constructed from the state, in other words). (Beverley 110-116)”.

The post-subalternist option largely depends on the temporalization of the State-people alliance, which leaves pressing questions relative to State form and patterns of accumulation untouched, or any excess that disrupts the culturalist consensus at the heart of every hegemonic articulation. The problem that arises from this specific conceptual design is that with the rise of the New Rights, which continue to operate on the basis of the expansion of social inclusion through consumption, the hegemony of a ‘non-State that acts as a State’ (another way through which Beverley defines postsubalternism), will be set to accomplish two simultaneous tasks: on the one hand, contain and polish the heterogeneity or savage dimension of ‘the people’ into the metaphoricity of national-popular representation; while on the other, reducing the State’s structures and institutions to the management of geopolitical processes and rent distribution. In a rather counterintuitive way, the post-sulbanternist option reenacts the decionism from the instrumentalization of the state as the exception to post-sovereign capital in the name of the people.

At the same time, facticity is now fully post-subalternist, but for the opposite reasons as those imagined by Beverley: hegemony’s de-hiearchization and economic administration convergences with the neoliberal general equivalent as real subsumption of capital renders hegemonic politics obsolete for substantial change. Ultimately, post-subalternist alliance curbs posthegemonic temporal intrusion, which forces a relentless displacement of its object of identification to disregard the constitutive tragic repetition of the fissure in its closure.

Post-subalternism is an attempt to reawake the specter of hegemony from the ruins of the political: from the inside it stands politics of subjectivization by the State, and from the outside, as a metapolitical form of order (katechon) to detain internal social explosion (Williams 61).

In recent years the post-subalternist paradigm has been somewhat displaced by what I have called elsewhere a ‘communal or communitarian turn’ (Muñoz 2016). Raquel Gutierrez Aguilar, a key thinker of communal horizontalism and also the author of the influential book Los ritmos de Pachakuti: Movilización y levantamiento indígena-popular en Bolivia (2008), at the end of last year conjured a radical turn towards the “communal” as the site for a new political program. In a more urgent tone, Huascar Salazar Lohman in Se han adueñado del proceso de lucha (2015) defines the position as following:

“Lo relevante es afirmar que la transformación heterogénea y multiforme que emerge de los entramados comunitarios implica la capacidad de dar forma a su reproducción de la vida social, trastocando, trans-formando o reformando la propia forma de la dominación…La manera en que los entramados comunitarios enfrentan al capital es a partir de vetos que permiten conservar, establecer, o restablecer relaciones sociales para reproducción la vida. En este sentido, el telos o el horizonte de deseo que media la lucha comunitaria es el despliegue de su propia forma de reproducir la vida, es decir, ampliar su capacidad de formación” (Salazar Lohman 35).

For both Gutierrez Aguilar and Salazar Lohman, the communitarian horizon requires breaking away from the dichotomy of civil society and State in order to relocate the temporal vitality of an autonomous re-production of life and the re-appropriation of that which the state has expropriated from communal property. However, if the communitarian form is not determined a priori by domination and capital, why is the emancipatory potential of the communitarianism emphasized solely on the basis of re-appropriation of what is valorized in the State? Salazar Huascar himself provides the answer to us when alluding to Bolivar Echevarria’s reconceptualization of the notion of use-value as yielding something like an inner exception within the logic of exchange. Communitarism, then, re-translates use-value as locational propriety.

Ironically, this is not very different from Álvaro Garcia Linera’s own attempt to “restore the communal (ayllu), against the logics of subsumption, through a re-functioning of culture and democracy and the recent juridical-political attempting to contain the ‘cunning of capital’ as it imposes its logics through its others…” (Kraniauskas 48). Although it seems the polar opposite of Huascar’s position, Garcia Linera’s instrumentalization of the communitarian through use-value mediates an indianization of the subject of social emancipation in the ‘community form’” (Kraniauskas 48). In fact, communitarianism ends up offering yet another exceptional particularism legitimized by the normative assumption of propriety and properness via-a-vis collective decision-making ( as ‘participacion directa y obligatoria’), and an alternative biopolitics of the ‘reproduction of life’ (reproducción de la vida). Communitarianism as a locational politics of resistance is already contained in the State’s shadow of community use-value, which is inverted on behalf of communitarian decisionism.

A similar paradox is at the heart of Diego Sztulwark and Veronica Gago’s essay that expands the temporality of the ‘end’ of the Latin American progressive cycle from below. On the one hand, they note that neoliberalism runs parallel to constituting a governmentality from above, and is also “inextricably linked to popular consumption, apparatuses of indebtness, and new forms of violence” as two dynamics that permute and sustain one another” from below (Gago & Sztulwark 610). While discerning the spectral dimension of contemporary flexible capital, they immediately move on to claim that it is on this plane where new counter-powers are transformed, modes of weaving together a resistance and a set of practical actions for political efficacy… (Gago & Sztulwark 612). However, counter-hegemonic subjective vitalism is already captured by the plasticity of financial subjectivization. Thus, this new vitalism framed solely as resistance only lifts political imagination to the domain of stasis or civil war already taking place in the territories, in which the struggle for subsistence takes the form of a neo-Francicanism eschatology (minimal relation to propriety) immanent to the financial subaltern bodies.

I would like to suggest that the two reflexive options sketched above, that of a post-subaltern state and the particular communitarian horizon, coincide in fashioning a politics of resistance after the closure of hegemonic principles. At the same time, the failure of hegemonic theory in the region is in this sense neither accidental nor limited to the temporalization of the so-called progressive cycle, since it also characteristic of the phenomenology of the originary fissure in the State form over the last two hundred years.

Hegemony or hegemon as an ultimate ontology of the political constitutes itself as a phantasm, which following Reiner Schürmann, denies the tragic dimension of the singular, translating norms and legislating laws in the name of its own sovereign principle. A phantasm is hegemonic when an entire culture relies on it as if it provided that in the name of which one speaks and acts. Such a chief-represented (hêgemôn) is at work upon the unspeakable singular classifying, inscribing, and distributing proper and commonality (Schürmann 22). In this sense, communitarianism and state hegemony are not just contending procedures of political decisionism, but more importantly, the two poles of a same structure waged on life as ultimate referent.

This is why, according to Schürmann, there is a “kind of joy of violent submission to it. Perhaps the intoxication they wish for us, or that we wish for ourselves through them” (Schürmann 29). To the extent that is waged on life, there has always been hegemony, although only as a phantasmatic economy to flatten and systematically erase the time of the tragic, whenever it appears to interrupt and ascend into the political principle. This is the time of the singular that is neither reducible to a subject in the eventfulness of history (a movement, a people or a multitude), nor a cultural schematization of identity and difference.

The challenge for thought is necessarily post-hegemonic, which I define as the potentiality for institutionalization of the tragic (singularity) in the anomic epoch of neoliberal administration. It is no coincide that both communitarian and hegemonic options define themselves against institutions, and they both respond to the moment of crisis of political epochality. A reformulation of an institutional form can mediate the ever-present pendulum movement that oscillates from neoliberal deregulation to the populist anti-institutionalism and back. But it so happens that populism does not posses a theory of institutionality, therefore is in no condition of providing a strategy to cope with the movement of the pendulum (Villacañas 2016). Since populism is always a decision on a concrete existential situation, it always remains attached to the perpetuity of the state of crisis as a decision made on and for life (understood in the Greek sense of krisis as judgment). As such, populism is the temporality of expropriation, and its process of abstractation into finite demands coincides with the money form (general equivalent) that structures the contemporary financial body of the living.

In the introduction to their edited volume Left Turns (2010), Beasley-Murray & Cameron & Herschberg noted that “if the Latin American states are to survive their current crisis of legitimacy they then need to be better funded, more efficient, and more reflexive of public preferences…the entire political class confronts the challenge of refunding the Latin American State” (Cameron & Herschberg 6). This was the promise and the stakes .Since then, the Latin American Progressive Cycle’s extreme presidencialism led to the withering of institutionalization making it easier for an accelerated restructuring of the State’s institutions by the New Rights technocrats. As the populist interpellation between friend and enemy evaporates in each political cycle, the price to be paid is life as thetic communitarian identity formation or as counter-hegemonic biopolitical vitalism. Constitutional scholar Bruce Ackerman alerts in his The Decline and Fall of the American Republic (2010) that the expansion of the powers of the ‘most dangerous branch’ (executive) effectively prepares the ground for an ominous neoliberal anti-institutionalization. This is what lurks in United States’ political future after the President-elect Donald Trump, and more generally, what haunts the spatial configuration of every western state’s void of legitimacy.

A posthegemonic institutionality for post-hegemonic times seeks the thinking of another relation with the political that is not reducible to the principle of a hegemonic phantasm as the oblivion of its own excess to equivalence. But perhaps more importantly here is how to think a posthegemonic institutional form that that would break away from the indeterminate concrescence of law as always already short-handed for internal exceptionality in order to redirect and put in motion the temporality of development. Thus, a posthegemonic institutionality will thrive to move beyond a notion of interruption or an insurrectionary moment dispensed in the phantasm of hegemony.

How can we imagine a form of life instituted not only in its irreducibility to the movement of vital ‘rhythm’, but in the arrival of the day after, when the last lights have gone off, after everyone has returned home, and mobilization gives way to demobilization? In his book on the Spartacist uprising, Furio Jesi says that the ‘decisive day of freedom’ is that which takes place the day after tomorrow, in which the time of living is not exhausted in life or death (Jesi 134). The crucial distinction here is a temporal one: living against life or death.

To institutionalize not life in the frame of biopolitics or communitarism, constituent power as passage to constituted power, but a destituent time of the living. The day after tomorrow is posthegemonic demobilization as distance from political ontology and its conversion into metapolitical community. Only by institutionalizing the temporality of an improper singularity could something like an inequivalent and ungraspable form of democracy and radical freedom could be conceived as the new truth in and beyond politics.

Bibliography

Ackerman, Bruce. The Decline and Fall of the American Republic. Boston: Harvard University Press, 2010.

Beverley, John. Latinamericanism after 9/11. Durham: Duke University Press, 2011.

Cameron, Maxwell & Herschberg, Eric. Latin America’s Left Turns: Politics, Policies, and Trajectories of Change. Boulder: Reinner Publishers, 2010.

Gago Verónica & Sztulwark Diego. “The Temporality of Social Struggle at the End of the “Progressive” Cycle” in Latin America”. SAQ, 115:3, July 2016.

Kraniauskas, John. “Universalizing the ayllu”. Radical Philosophy, 192, July-August, 2015.

Moreiras, Alberto. Marranismo e inscripción. Madrid: Escolar & Mayo, 2016.

Muñoz Gerardo (ed.). “The End of the Latin American Progressive Cycle” (dossier). Alternautas (3.1, July 2016). http://las.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2016/11/Alternautas_End-of-Progressive-Cycle-Dossier-2016.pdf

Salazar Lohman, Huascar. “Se Han adueñado del proceso de lucha”: horizonte comunitario-populares en tensión y la reconstitución de la dominación en la Bolivia del MAS. La Paz: autodeterminación, 2015.

Schürmann, Reiner. Broken Hegemonies. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003.

Villacañas, José Luis. Populismo. Madrid: La Huerta Grande, 2015.

.
Williams, Gareth. “Los límites de la hegemonía”. Poshegemonía: el final de un paradigma de la filosofía política en América Latina (Castro Orellana, ed.). Madrid: Biblioteca Nueva, 2015.

Life During Wartime: Eleven Theses on Infrapolitics

RACAL

“Life During Wartime: Infrapolitics and Posthegemony”
(with a coda of eleven theses on infrapolitics)

Presented at the III Seminario Crítico-Político Transnacional
“Pensamiento y terror social: El archivo hispano”
Cuenca, Spain
July, 2016

Why stay in college? Why go to night school?
Gonna be different this time.
Can’t write a letter, can’t send a postcard.
I can’t write nothing at all.
–The Talking Heads

In what is no doubt the most famous theorist of war’s most famous claim, Carl Von Clausewitz tells us that “war has its root in a political object.” He goes on: “War is a mere continuation of politics by other means. [. . .] War is not merely a political act, but a real political instrument, a continuation of political commerce, a carrying out of the same by other means” (119). There is, then, for Clausewitz an essential continuity between war and politics; they share the same rationality and ends. And this notion has in turn led many to think of politics, reciprocally, as a form of warfare. The German theorist Carl Schmitt, for instance, defines politics in suitably martial terms as a clash between “friend” and “enemy”: “The specific political distinction to which political actions and motives can be reduced is that between friend and enemy” (The Concept of the Political 26). Moreover, this invocation of the term “enemy” is scarcely metaphorical. Schmitt argues that “an enemy exists only when, at least potentially, one fighting collectivity of people confronts a similar collectivity” (28), and he further qualifies the particular type of enmity involved in political disagreement in terms of classical theories of warfare: the political enemy is a “public enemy,” that is a hostis, as opposed to a “private enemy.” He quotes a Latin lexicon to make his point: “A public enemy (hostis) is one with whom we are at war publicly. [. . .] A private enemy is a person who hates us, whereas a public enemy is a person who fights against us” (29).

Likewise, the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci also calls upon the language of warfare to describe political activity, which he classifies in terms of the “war of manoeuvre” by which a political party bids for influence among the institutions of so-called civil society, and the “war of movement” when it is in a position to seek power directly from the state. Indeed, the notion of an essential continuity between armed violence and civil dispute informs Gramsci’s fundamental conception of “hegemony,” which characterizes politics in terms of a combination of coercion and consent, the attempt to win or secure power alternately by means of force or persuasion. War is politics, politics is war: the basic goals and rationale are the same, we are told. It is just the means that are different.

Keep reading… (PDF document)

eleven theses on infrapolitics

  1. Infrapolitics is not against politics. It is not apolitical, still less antipolitical.
  2. There is no politics without infrapolitics.
  3. It is only by considering infrapolitics that we can better demarcate the terrain of the political per se, understand it, and take it seriously.
  4. The interface between the infrapolitical and the political cannot be conceived simply in terms of capture.
  5. Only a fully developed theory of posthegemony can account properly for the relationship between infrapolitics and politics.
  6. Infrapolitics corresponds to the virtual, and so to habitus and unqualified affect.
  7. The constitution (and dissolution) of the political always involves civil war.
  8. Biopolitics is the name for the colonization of the infrapolitical realm by political forces, and so the generalization of civil war.
  9. But neither politics nor biopolitics have any predetermined valence; biopolitics might also be imagined to be the colonization of the political by the infrapolitical.
  10. None of these terms–politics, infrapolitics, biopolitics, posthegemony–can have any normative dimension.
  11. Hitherto, philosophers have only sought to change the world in various ways. The point, however, is to interpret it.